Macmillan's Magazine, Volume 87 (Google eBook)

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Macmillan and Company, 1903
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Page 357 - Romans, countrymen, and lovers! Hear me for my cause, and be silent, that you may hear. Believe me for mine honour, and have respect to mine honour, that you may believe. Censure me in your wisdom, and awake your senses, that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar's, to him I say that Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his.
Page 356 - It must be by his death : and, for my part, I know no personal cause to spurn at him, But for the general. He would be crown'd : How that might change his nature, there's the question : It is the bright day that brings forth the adder ; And that craves wary walking.
Page 359 - Would he were fatter : but I fear him not : Yet if my name were liable to fear, I do not know the man I should avoid So soon as that spare Cassius. He reads much ; He is a great observer, and he looks Quite through the deeds of men...
Page 358 - Rome, thou hast lost the breed of noble bloods ! When went there by an age, since the great flood, But it was famed with more than with one man...
Page 353 - Stoop then, and wash. How many ages hence, Shall this our lofty scene be acted over, In states unborn, and accents yet unknown ? Bru.
Page 183 - Awake, my St. John! leave all meaner things To low ambition, and the pride of kings. Let us (since life can little more supply Than just to look about us and to die) Expatiate free o'er all this scene of man; A mighty maze!
Page 142 - Hast thou not a heart; canst thou not suffer whatsoever it be; and, as a Child of Freedom, though outcast, trample Tophet itself under thy feet, while it consumes thee? Let it come, then; I will meet it and defy it!
Page 362 - Ingratitude, more strong than traitors' arms, Quite vanquished him : then burst his mighty heart ; And, in his mantle muffling up his face, 191 Even at the base of Pompey's statue, Which all the while ran blood, great Caesar fell.
Page 358 - Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world, Like a Colossus ; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves.
Page 524 - A Short History of Natural Science and of the Progress of Discovery, From the Time of the Greeks to the Present Time.

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