Das Kapital: A Critique of Political Economy, Volume 1

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Regnery Publishing, Jul 1, 1996 - Political Science - 356 pages
39 Reviews
Serge Levitsky presents a new revised version of Karl Marx's masterpiece, Das Kapital, carefully retranslated for the modern reader and abridged to emphasize the political and philosophical core of Marx's work, while trimming away much that is now unimportant.
  

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Review: Das Kapital

User Review  - Ravyn - Goodreads

While some parts of Das Kapital are, at least, engaging - Marx' future predictions of the outcomes of monopoly and capitalism have simply not come to pass. Seems to fall into the "Expert" falacy. Read full review

Review: Das Kapital

User Review  - Jonathan S - Goodreads

Really a good book, worth of reading it. There are the times where labors and workers are treated as slaves, Marx shed the light on those philosophies and demolished the master and slave prophecy Read full review

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Selected pages

Contents

COMMODITIES AND MONEY
1
SECTION 2 THE TWOFOLD CHARACTER OF THE LABOUR EMBODIED IN COMMODITIES
7
SECTION 3 THE FORM OF VALUE OR EXCHANGE VALUE
16
A Elementary or Accidental Form of Value
17
2 The Relative form of value
19
b Quantitative determination of Relative value
24
3 The Equivalent form of value
27
4 The Elementary form of value considered as a whole
34
SECTION 2 THE GREED FOR SURPLUS LABOUR MANUFACTURER AND BOYARD
183
SECTION 4 DAY AND NIGHT WORK THE RELAY SYSTEM
185
SECTION 5 THE STRUGGLE FOR A NORMAL WORKING DAY
186
RATE AND MASS OF SURPLUSVALUE
189
PRODUCTION OF RELATIVE SURPLUS VALUE
201
COOPERATION
210
DIVISION OF LABOUR AND MANUFACTURE
222
SECTION 2 THE DETAIL LABOURER AND HIS IMPLEMENTS
223

B Total or Expanded form of value
37
2 The particular Equivalent form
39
C The General form of value
41
2 The interdependent development of the Relative form of value and of the Equivalent form
45
3 Transition from the General form to the Money form
47
D The Money form
48
SECTION 4 THE FETISHISM OF COMMODITIES AND THE SECRET THEREOF
50
EXCHANGE
63
MONEY OR THE CIRCULATION OF COMMODITIES
72
SECTION 2 THE MEDIUM OF CIRCULATION
82
b The Currency of Money
91
c Coin and Symbols of Value
102
SECTION 3 MONEY
108
b Means of Payment
112
c Universal Money
119
THE TRANSFORMATION OF MONEY INTO CAPITAL
123
CONTRADICTIONS IN THE GENERAL FORMULA OF CAPITAL
126
THE BUYING AMD SELLING OF LABOURPOWER
134
THE PRODUCTION OF ABSOLUTE SURPLUSVALUE
143
SECTION 2 THE PRODUCTION OF SURPLUSVALUE
150
CONSTANT CAPITAL AND VARIABLE CAPITAL
165
THE RATE OF SURPLUSVALUE
174
SECTION 4 SURPLUS PRODUCE
179
THE WORKING DAY
180
SECTION 4 DIVISION OF LABOUR IN MANUFACTURE AND DIVISION OF LABOUR IN SOCIETY
224
SECTION 5 THE CAPITALISTIC CHARACTER OF MANUFACTURE
229
MACHINERY AND MODERN INDUSTRY
234
SECTION 2 THE VALUE TRANSFERRED BY MACHINERY TO THE PRODUCT
235
SECTION 3 THE APPROXIMATE EFFECTS OF MACHINERY ON THE WORKMAN
240
SECTION 4 THE FACTORS
246
SECTION 6 THE THEORY OF COMPENSATION AS REGARDS THE WORKPEOPLE DISPLACED BY MACHINERY
250
WAGES
255
TIMEWAGES
264
PIECEWAGES
272
NATIONAL DIFFERENCES OF WAGES
275
THE ACCUMULATION OF CAPITAL
279
SIMPLE REPRODUCTION
281
CONVERSION OF SURPLUSVALUE INTO CAPITAL
293
SECTION 3 SEPARATION OF SURPLUSVALUE INTO CAPITAL AND REVENUE THE ABSTINENCE THEORY
306
SECTION 4 CIRCUMSTANCES THAT INDEPENDENTLY OF THE PROPORTIONAL DIVISION OF SURPLUSVALUE INTO CAPITAL AND R...
310
THE GENERAL LAW OF CAPITALIST ACCUMULATION
317
SECTION 2 RELATIVE DIMINUTION OF THE VARIABLE PART OF CAPITAL SIMULTANEOUSLY WITH THE PROGRESS OF ACCUMUL...
320
SECTION 3 PROGRESSIVE PRODUCTION OF A RELATIVE SURPLUSPOPULATION OR INDUSTRIAL RESERVE ARMY
332
SECTION 4 DIFFERENT FORMS OF THE RELATIVE SURPLUSPOPULATION THE GENERAL LAW OF CAPITALISTIC ACCUMULATION
342
THE SOCALLED PRIMITIVE ACCUMULATION
349
HISTORICAL TENDENCY OF CAPITALIST ACCUMULATION
352
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About the author (1996)

Karl Heinrich Marx, one of the fathers of communism, was born on May 5, 1818 in Trier, Germany. He was educated at a variety of German colleges, including the University of Jena. He was an editor of socialist periodicals and a key figure in the Working Man's Association. Marx co-wrote his best-known work, "The Communist Manifesto" (1848), with his friend, Friedrich Engels. Marx's most important work, however, may be "Das Kapital" (1867), an analysis of the economics of capitalism. He died on March 14, 1883 in London, England.

Friedrich Engels is perhaps best remembered as the confidant, colleague, and benefactor of Karl Marx. Engels was born into a Calvinist family on November 28, 1820. The family owned fabric mills in the Rhineland and had business interests in Manchester, England, Engels joined the family business at age 16; he never had a formal university education. Despite his family's industrial background, Engels was sympathetic to the poverty of the working masses. At age 18 he published an attack on industrial poverty, and later joined the Hegelian movement that so influenced Marx and bothered conservative Prussian authorities. Engels first met Marx in 1842, while Marx was editor of a radical newspaper in Cologne. However, they did not establish their lifelong friendship until they met again in Paris two years later. Engels published several works related to economics, the first of which, Outlines of a Critique of Political Economy (1844), attempted to reconcile Hegelian philosophy with the principles of political economy. His second book, The Condition of the Working Class in England (1845), was a damning description and condemnation of the poverty generated by the Industrial Revolution. Engels also co-authored three major works with Marx, the most important being the Communist Manifesto (1948). Engels also wrote several historical works, which are more important to historians than to economists. These include The Peasant War in Germany (1850), Germany: Revolution and Counter-Revolution (1851), and The Origin of the Family, Private Property and the State (1884). In general, these works are more descriptive than theoretical, and they closely parallel Marx's views on industrialization and class struggle. In addition to being a friend of Marx, Engels was his prime benefactor for a number of years. During their early years in London, beginning in 1849, the Marx family was nearly destitute, and it was only through the generosity of Engels that they prevailed. Engels was also responsible for the publication of Marx's Das Kapital. Before his death, Marx was only able to complete the first volume of this work, and so Engels edited and arranged for the publication of the last two volumes after Marx's death. Engels was an engaging and thoughtful writer. It was perhaps his great fortune and misfortune that he was connected so closely to Marx. On the one hand, he was responsible for bringing much of Marx's work to fruition in his role as benefactor and editor. On the other hand, the shadow of Marx eclipsed some of the exposure that Engels's own ideas and contributions might have had. Engels died of throat cancer in London, 1895. Following cremation at Woking Crematorium, his ashes were scattered off Beachy Head, near Eastbourne as he had requested.

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