White Mughals: love and betrayal in eighteenth-century India

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Viking, 2002 - History - 459 pages
90 Reviews
From the early sixteenth century, it was common for British colonizers in India to embarrass the Crown by "turning Turk" or "going native." Few caused greater scandal than James Kirkpatrick, a British resident in the Court of Hyderabad, who converted to Islam and spied on the East India Company in the midst of an affair with Khair un-Nissa, the great-niece of the region's prime minister. White Mogulsis rich with many eccentric characters, from "Hindoo Stuart," who traveled with his own team of Brahmins, to Alexander Gardner, an American whose self-invented costume was showcased by a tartan turban with egret plumes. A remarkable love story set in an exotic and previously unexplored world, White Mogulsis full of secrets, intrigue, espionage, and religious disputes and conjures all the resonance of a great nineteenth-century novel.

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I love William Dalrymple's writing style so much - Goodreads
The depth of scholarship is mind-boggling. - Goodreads
Also a poignant love story. - Goodreads
Hence his writing style is entirely new to me. - Goodreads
The book is brilliantly researched. - Goodreads
But the author mostly talks about his research. - Goodreads

Review: White Mughals: Love and Betrayal in Eighteenth-Century India

User Review  - Christabel Britto - Goodreads

Maybe I am biased, having lived in Delhi and Hyderabad and in close proximity to some of what the author writes about by way of legacy from colonial times - but so far I have read two of Dalrymple's ... Read full review

Review: White Mughals: Love and Betrayal in Eighteenth-Century India

User Review  - Harsh Dutta - Goodreads

White Mughals is the truth that fiction is made of. What begins as the boiling tale of a young and influential British Resident gradually cycles into a poignant climax of more than the protagonist, of ... Read full review

Contents

India in 1795 1 xvii
1
Clossary 1
397
Bibliograpby 1
441
Copyright

1 other sections not shown

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About the author (2002)

William Dalrymple was born in Scotland and brought up on the shores of the Firth of Forth. When he was twenty-two he wrote the highly acclaimed bestseller "In Xanadu," which was shortlisted for the John Llewellyn Rhys Memorial Prize. In 1989 Dalrymple moved to Delhi where he lived for six years researching his second book, "City of Djinns," which won the 1994 Thomas Cook Travel Book Award and the "Sunday Times" Young British Writer of the Year Award.
He is married to the artist Olivia Fraser, and they have three children. They now divide their time between London and Delhi.

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