Democratic governance

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Free Press, 1995 - Political Science - 293 pages
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In this thought-provoking new work, long-term collaborators James March and Johan Olsen construct a brilliant foundation for thinking about the broad theoretical concerns of democratic governance. Building on the work that began with their seminal essay on "The New Institutionalism" in "The American Political Science Review" in 1984 and continued in "Rediscovering Institutions", March and Olsen challenge key aspects of standard contemporary thinking. While conventional thought is based primarily on the premises of individualism and self-interest, the authors argue that exchange theories of democracy are incomplete, reflecting only a partial view of history and human action. Going beyond democratic theory, March and Olsen draw on social science to examine how political institutions create and sustain democratic solidarity, identities, capabilities, accounts, and adaptiveness; how they can maintain and elaborate democratic values and beliefs-- and how governance might be made honorable, just,and effective. They show how democratic governance is both proactive and reactive-- creating interests and power as well as responding to them-- and how it shapes not only an understanding of the past and an ability to learn from it, but even history itself. By exploring how governance transcends the creation of coalitions that reflect existing preferences, resources, rights, and rules, the authors reveal how it includes the actual formation of these defining principles o

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Contents

PERSPECTIVES ON GOVERNANCE
7
DEVELOPING POLITICAL IDENTITIES
49
DEVELOPING POLITICAL CAPABILITIES
91
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

James G. March is a Professor Emeritus at Stanford University.

Johan P. Olsen (b. 14 August 1939 in Tromso, Norway) is professor in political science and Director of Research at the Centre for European Studies, University of Oslo. Either alone or in collaboration with colleagues, he has written or edited 19 books and written more than 100 book chapters and
articles, many of them in leading international journals. Together with James G. March and Michael D. Cohen he developed the 'garbage can'-model of organizational decision making, and together with March he launched the concept of 'new institutionalism' in the mid 1980s. He received the American
Political Science Association's John Gaus Award for his life-long contribution to public administration and political science

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