Dressmaking and Millinery (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Survey Committee of the Cleveland Foundation, 1916 - Dressmaking - 133 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 7 - Staff" is one of the 25 sections of the report of the Education Survey of Cleveland conducted by the Survey Committee of the Cleveland Foundation in 1915.
Page 93 - In the academic high schools, this year for the first time, a two-year elective course in sewing three hours a week is offered as a part of the home economics course. The aim of this sewing, which is called domestic art, is stated thus: "Problem my personal appearance is one of my chief assets. What can I do to improve it?
Page 136 - CLEVELAND EDUCATION SURVEY REPORTS These reports can be secured from the Survey Committee of the Cleveland Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio. They will be sent postpaid for 25 cents per volume with the exception of "Measuring the Work of the Public Schools" by Judd, "The Cleveland School Survey" by Ayres, and "Wage Earning and Education
Page 77 - ... week, the average being about $8. Trimmers earn from $10 to $40, with an average of about $18. Out of 45 retail shops, only 22 paid as high as $10 to any maker; 15 paid as high as $12; six paid as high as $15; and only one paid over $15. In millinery departments in stores, trimmers, who are generally designers, earn from $15 to $50 a week or more. The rate most commonly received is $25. Makers are started at from $4 to $6 and may advance to $15, with an average of about $10. In wholesale houses...
Page 124 - ... practice, and the remaining time to related subjects. Girls who have graduated from elementary schools or those 14 years of age and able to pass the work of the sixth grade in the elementary schools are admitted to the school. The course can be completed by the average girl in one year. Girls are admitted on Monday of each week and may choose the trade they wish to learn. The instruction is individual and girls are promoted as rapidly as their work will permit. A diploma is given to girls who...
Page 133 - ... enrolled in February of this year, less than seven per cent had attended more than two terms. The courses now given are not planned for workers in the sewing trades, but to help women and girls who want to learn how to make, alter, and repair their own garments. It is doubtful whether the courses and equipment available in the night schools as they are organized at present are such as to warrant undertaking specialized trade training. What workers already engaged in the sewing trades need is...
Page 123 - ... are given: designing and perforating for embroidery, drawing and costume designing, cooking, physical training, business arithmetic and accounts, business English, textiles, and industrial conditions and trade ethics. About five hours each day, or 25 hours per week, are devoted to trade practice, and the remaining time to related subjects. Girls who have graduated from elementary schools...
Page 134 - ... training. The reorganization of the junior high school work to meet the needs of prospective workers assumes great importance from the fact that seven out of 10 girls drop out some time during their junior high school period. Courses should be reorganized so as to give basic preparation for wageearning and should be as concrete and real as a thorough understanding of the requirements of the gainful occupations can make them. Thorough sewing courses planned from the standpoint of the sewing trades...
Page 39 - ... threetenths milliners. For the most part they were of native birth. The proportion of young girls engaged in these occupations was relatively small, the age distribution showing that only about one-third of the milliners and less than one-fifth of the dressmakers were under 21 years of age. DRESSMAKING Four distinctive lines of work are done by those who are classified by the census as dressmakers and seamstresses: dressmaking proper, usually carried on in shops; alteration work in stores; general...
Page 60 - ... wage. Girls may serve without pay for six months, or may start at from 50 cents to $4 a week. At the end of six months they may be earning from $1.50 to $6. The lack of any wage standard in apprenticeship probably accounts for the fact that it is difficult to get girls to enter this trade. MILLINERY Millinery requires the handling of small pieces of the most varied sorts of material, most of it perishable. The materials must be measured, cut, turned, twisted, and draped into innumerable designs...

Bibliographic information