A Social History of England, 1851-1990

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 1991 - History - 384 pages
0 Reviews
Francois Bedarida's elegant and persuasive essay on the main themes of British history since the mid-nineteenth century has been a popular text for students of the British Empire. In this edition of his widely-acclaimed work, Bedarida has added a substantial analysis of recent English history from 1975 to 1990. He takes a detached, perceptive, and quizzical view of the transformation of British society over the last fifteen years; a time which has witnessed a transformation of the British into a nation of go-getting, home-owning, share-owning entrepreneurs. While acknowledging that two-thirds of British society are better-off for the changes, Bedarida emphasizes the costs of development. He focuses on the British 'under-class', the one-third of the population living below the poverty line and sliding irrevocably into squalor and oblivion. Critical, but not without hope, Bedarida finds in Britain's increasingly fragmented and individualistic society a collective conscience which continues to flicker.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

THE MERITS OF HIERARCHY
36
POWER AND CONSENSUS
73
18801914
97
THE SPLENDOUR AND SQUALOR OF A GOLDEN AGE
144
191455
165
THE IMMUTABLE CLASS SYSTEM
200
THE SLOWLY CHANGING SOCIAL LANDSCAPE
226
A disrupted society
249
DECADENCE OR WISDOM?
274
Conclusion 200
290
Postscript 197590 206
296
Notes to the text
327
Bibliography
361
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information