A Tale of Two Cities

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James Nisbet & Company, Limited, 1902 - 454 pages
343 Reviews
"It was the best of times, it was the worst of times." Charles Dickens' classic novel tells the story of two Englishmen--degenerate lawyer Sydney Carton and aristocrat Charles Darnay--who fall in love with the same woman in the midst of the French Revolution's blood and terror. Originally published as 31 weekly instalments,A Tale of Two Cities has been adapted several times for film, serves as a rite of passage for many students, and is one of the most famous novels ever published.

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User Review  - msaucier818 - LibraryThing

I started this book for two main reasons. First, I read Great Expectations last year for the second time and love it. Second, I teach A.P. European History and we study the French Revolution in detail ... Read full review

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User Review  - PamV - LibraryThing

All I can say about this book is "I got through it"! Without the spark notes, I would not have understood a single thing here, but I have officially read a classic because I wanted to, not because I was forced to. Read full review

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Page 454 - It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known.
Page 453 - I am the Resurrection and the Life, saith the Lord : he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live : and whosoever liveth and believeth in me shall never die." The murmuring of many voices, the upturning of many faces, the pressing on of many footsteps in the outskirts of the crowd, so that it swells forward in a mass, like one great heave of water, all flashes away.
Page 13 - A WONDERFUL fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other.
Page 63 - TELLSON'S Bank by Temple Bar was an old-fashioned place, even in the year one thousand seven hundred and eighty. It was very small, very dark, very ugly, very incommodious. It was an old-fashioned place, moreover, in the moral attribute that the partners in the house were proud of its smallness, proud of its darkness, proud of its ugliness, proud of its incommodiousness. They were even boastful of its eminence in those particulars, and were fired by an express conviction that, if it were less objectionable,...

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