A Voyage to the East Indies: Containing an Account of the Manners, Customs, &c. of the Natives, ... Collected from Observations Made ... Between 1776 and 1789, ... By Fra Paolino Da San Bartolomeo, ... With Notes and Illustrations by John Reinhold Forster, ... Translated from the German by William Johnston

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J. Davis: and sold by Vernor and Hood; and J. Cuthell, 1800 - India - 478 pages
 

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Page 250 - Ran purple poison down, and drain'd the fainting heart. Blood falls for tears, and o'er his mournful face The ruddy drops their tainted passage trace: Where'er the liquid juices find a way, There streams of blood, there crimson rivers stray...
Page 250 - Where'er the liquid juices find a way There streams of blood, there crimson rivers stray ; His mouth and gushing nostrils pour a flood ; And ev'n the pores ooze out the trickling blood; In the red deluge all the parts lie drowned, And the whole body seems one bleeding wound.
Page 250 - Now the warm blood at once, from every part, Ran purple poifon down, and drain'd the fainting heart. Blood falls for tears ;. and o'er his mournful face The ruddy drops their tainted paflage trace. Where'er the liquid juices find a way, There ftreams of blood, there crimfon rivers ftray. His mouth and gufhing...
Page 180 - For my part I could not help admiring the goodness of heart, affability, and humanity of this prince, as well as the simplicity of his household establishment and way of life.
Page 42 - Gypjies, whom the Italians call Zingaros, and Zinganos, were no other than Zinganians, as M. D'ANVIL.LE alfo writes the word, who might, in fome piratical expedition, have landed on the coaft of Arabia or Africa, whence...
Page 248 - It is a palm or a palm and a half in length ; has the colour of withered leaves ; and does not, like other fnakes, creep ftraight forwards, but always rears one of its heads, and makes an arch with its body when it moves. Its bite always occasions a tumour filled with venom ; but the poifon als very (lowly, fo that it is feldom or never too late to apply a remedy •.
Page 50 - It is a conqueror's business to repair a part of the mischief he has occasioned. The right, therefore, of conquest I define thus: a necessary, lawful, but unhappy power, which leaves the conqueror under a heavy obligation of repairing the injuries done to humanity.
Page 14 - ... devastations, not only in sugar plantations, but also among furniture and clothes in habitations. When I examined the different articles in the chest, I observed that these little animals had perforated my shirts in a thousand places, and gnawed to pieces my books, my girdle, my amice, and my shoes.
Page 248 - When one of this kind is killed, a great many of the fame fpecies refort to the place, and remain in the neighbourhood till their dead companion is removed. However incredible this circumftance may appear, it is certain that an inftance of it occurred at the feminary of jimbalacatti, in the prefence of at lead thirty perfons.

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