A Graded List of Common Words Difficult to Spell

Front Cover
D.C. Heath & Company, 1891 - Spellers - 88 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 76 - Monosyllables and words accented on the last syllable ending in a single consonant preceded by a single vowel double the final consonant before a suffix beginning with a vowel.
Page 83 - But have you ever rightly considered what the mere ability to read means ? That it is the key which admits us to the whole world of thought and fancy and imagination ? to the company of saint and sage, of the wisest and the...
Page 84 - Language is the amber in which a thousand precious and subtle thoughts have been safely embedded and preserved. It has arrested ten thousand lightning flashes of genius, which, unless thus fixed and arrested, might have been as bright, but •would have also been as quickly passing and perishing, as the lightning.
Page 87 - The dialect of conversation is now-a-days so swelled with vanity and compliment, and so surfeited (as I may say) of expressions of kindness and respect, that if a man that lived an age or two ago should return into the world again, he would really want a dictionary to help him to understand his own language...
Page 82 - I should have felt little desire to seek elsewhere its gratification : for on no country have the charms of nature been more prodigally lavished. Her mighty lakes, like oceans of liquid silver ; her mountains, with their bright aerial tints ; her valleys, teeming with wild fertility ; her tremendous cataracts, thundering in their solitudes; her boundless plains, waving with spontaneous verdure ; her broad deep rivers, rolling in solemn silence to the ocean ; her trackless forests, where vegetation...
Page 86 - Amongst too many other instances of the great corruption and degeneracy of the age wherein we live, the great and general want of sincerity in conversation, is none of the least. The world is grown so full of dissimulation and compliment, that men's words are hardly any signification of their thoughts ; and if any man measure his words by his heart, and speak as he thinks, and do not express more kindness to every mall than men Usually have for any man, he can hardly escape the censure of want of...
Page 85 - Words convey the mental treasures of one period to the generations that follow; and laden with this, their precious freight, they sail safely across gulfs of time in which empires have suffered shipwreck, and the languages of common life have sunk into oblivion.
Page 84 - For remember that there is nothing less profitable than scholarship for the mere sake of scholarship, nor anything more wearisome in the attainment. But the moment you have a definite aim, attention is quickened, the mother of memory, and all that you acquire groups and arranges itself in an order that is lucid, because everywhere and always it is in intelligent relation to a central object of constant and growing interest. This method also forces upon us the necessity of thinking, which is, after...
Page 81 - I visited various parts of my own country; and, had I been merely influenced by a love of fine scenery, I should have felt little desire to seek elsewhere its gratification, for on no country have the charms of Nature been more prodigally lavished. Her mighty lakes, like oceans of liquid silver ; her mountains, with their bright aerial tints ; her valleys, teeming with wild...
Page 83 - One is sometimes asked by young people to recommend a course of reading. My advice would be that they should confine themselves to the supreme books in whatever literature, or still better to choose some one great author, and make themselves thoroughly familiar with him. For, as all roads lead to Rome, so do they likewise lead away from it, and you will find that, in order to understand perfectly and weigh exactly any vital piece of literature, you will be gradually and pleasantly persuaded to excursions...

Bibliographic information