A Grain of Wheat

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Heinemann, 1986 - Fiction - 247 pages
9 Reviews
Ngugi takes the reader back to the days preceding Kenya's independence. Mugo, a farmer and hero in the eyes of the villagers, is asked to deliver a speech during the Uhuru celebrations, to be held in memory of his friend Kihika. He refuses to make a speech and turns out to be a traitor.
 

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A Grain of Wheat is an interesting historical piece that grabs the attention of its audience right off the bat. The use of unity, nationalism, and oppression as themes give the book emotional value. The historical context is spot on, it seems like all truth. The battle between the good for the community versus the good for an individual is a challenging question worth pondering for anyone. This is a great read for a person who loves to read about history, culture, conflict, betrayal, or love.  

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Contents

I
1
II
10
III
18
IV
33
V
48
VI
57
VII
70
VIII
122
XI
163
XII
167
XIII
178
XIV
203
XV
224
XVI
232
XVII
239
XVIII
244

IX
131
X
155

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About the author (1986)

Ngugi is world famous for his novels from Weep Not, Child to Matigari and the impact of his plays, especially in Gikuyu, which led to his detention in Kenya. He is now Professor of Comparative Literature and Performance Studies in New York University. This book reflects many of the concerns found in Decolonising the Mind and Moving the Centre.

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