A Practical Treatise on Medical Jurisprudence: With So Much of Anatomy, Physiology, Pathology, and the Practice of Medicine and Surgery, as are Essential to be Known by Members of Parliament, Lawyers, Coroners, Magistrates, Officers in the Army and Navy, and Private Gentlemen; and All the Laws Relating to Medical Practitioners, Part 1

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Carey, Lea & Blanchard, 1836 - Medical jurisprudence - 509 pages
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Page 364 - Quiconque aura attenté aux mœurs en excitant, favorisant ou facilitant habituellement la débauche ou la corruption de la jeunesse de l'un ou de l'autre sexe, au-dessous de l'âge de vingt et un ans, sera puni d'un emprisonnement de six mois à deux ans et d'une amende de 50 à 500 francs.
Page 383 - ... shall be guilty of felony, and being convicted thereof, shall suffer death as...
Page 358 - is very difficult to define the invisible line that divides perfect " and partial insanity; but it must rest upon circumstances duly " to be weighed and considered both by the judge and jury, lest on " the one side there be a kind of inhumanity towards the defects of " human nature, or, on the other side, too great an indulgence
Page 360 - ... any other principle, every departure from sober rational conduct would be an emancipation from criminal justice. I shall place my claim to your verdict upon no such dangerous foundation. I must convince you not only that the unhappy prisoner was a lunatic within my own definition of lunacy, bnt that the act in question was the immediate unqualified offspring of the disease.
Page 360 - In other cases, reason is not driven from her seat, but distraction sits down upon it along with her, holds her, trembling, upon it, and frightens her from her propriety. Such patients are victims to delusions of the most alarming description, which so overpower the faculties and usurp so firmly the place of realities, as not to be dislodged and shaken by the organs of perception and sense; in such cases the images frequently vary, but in the same subject are generally of the same terrific character.
Page 360 - ... are the cases which frequently mock the wisdom of the wisest in judicial trials ; because such persons often reason with a subtlety which puts in the shade the ordinary conceptions of mankind : their conclusions are just, and frequently profound ; but the premises from which they reason, WHEN WITHIN THE RANGE OF THE MALADY, are uniformly false : — not false from any defect of knowledge or judgment ; but, because a delusive image, the inseparable companion of real insanity, is thrust upon the...
Page 357 - ... which makes him accountable for his actions, and that the deprivation of reason acquits him of crime. This principle is indisputable ; yet so fearfully and wonderfully are we made, so infinitely subtle is the spiritual part of our being, so difficult is it to trace with accuracy the effect of diseased intellect upon human action, that I may appeal to all who hear me, whether there are any causes more difficult, or which, indeed, so often confound the learning of the judges themselves, as when...
Page 361 - I cannot consider such a man as falling within the protection which the law gives, and is bound to give, to those whom it has pleased God, for mysterious causes, to visit with this most afflicting calamity. He alone can be so emancipated, whose disease (call it what you •will) consists, not merely in seeing with a prejudiced eye, or with odd and absurd particularities, differing in many respects from the contemplations of sober sense, upon the actual existences of things ; but, he only whose whole...
Page 358 - It is very difficult to define the invisible line that divides perfect and partial insanity ; but it must rest upon circumstances, duly to be weighed and considered both by judge and jury ; lest, on the one side, there be a kind of inhumanity towards the defects of human nature ; or, on the other side, too great an indulgence given to great crimes...
Page 362 - I have possessed for five years the regulation of the weather, and the distribution of the seasons ; the sun has listened to my dictates, and passed from tropic to tropic by my direction ; the clouds, at my call, have poured their waters, and the Nile has overflowed at my command ; I have restrained the rage of the dog-star, and mitigated the fervours of the crab. The winds alone, of all the elemental powers, have hitherto refused my authority, and multitudes have perished by equinoctial tempests...

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