Coleridge's The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

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Herbert Bates
Longmans, Green and Company, 1895 - 48 pages
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Page 12 - Nor any drop to drink. The very deep did rot; O Christ! That ever this should be! Yea, slimy things did crawl with legs Upon the slimy sea!
Page 10 - And I had done a hellish thing. And it would work 'em woe: For all averred. I had killed the bird That made the breeze to blow.
Page xix - In the one, the incidents and agents were to be, in part at least, supernatural ; and the excellence aimed at, was to consist in the interesting of the affections by the dramatic truth of such emotions, as would naturally accompany such situations, supposing them real.
Page 11 - All in a hot and copper sky, The bloody Sun, at noon, Right up above the mast did stand, No bigger than the Moon. Day after day, day after day, We stuck, nor breath nor motion; As idle as a painted ship Upon a painted ocean.
Page 43 - When the ivy-tod is heavy with snow, And the owlet whoops to the wolf below, That eats the she-wolf's young.
Page 48 - He prayeth best who loveth best All things both great and small ; For the dear God who loveth us, He made and loveth all.
Page 48 - One lesson, shepherd, let us two divide, Taught both by what she shows, and what conceals • Never to blend our pleasure or our pride With sorrow of the meanest thing that feels.
Page 44 - Laughed loud and long, and all the while His eyes went to and fro. "Ha! ha!" quoth he, "full plain I see, The Devil knows how to row.
Page 24 - I closed my lids, and kept them close, And the balls like pulses beat; For the sky and the sea, and the sea and the sky, Lay like a load on my weary eye, And the dead were at my feet.
Page 25 - Moon, and the stars that still sojourn, yet still move onward ; and every where the blue sky, belongs to them, and is their appointed rest, and their native country and their own natural homes, which they enter unannounced, as lords that are certainly expected and yet there is a silent joy at their arrival.

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