Dreamtigers

Front Cover
University of Texas Press, 1985 - Poetry - 95 pages

Dreamtigers has been heralded as one of the literary masterpieces of the twentieth century by Mortimer J. Adler, editor of Great Books of the Western World. It has been acknowledged by its author as his most personal work. Composed of poems, parables, and stories, sketches and apocryphal quotations, Dreamtigers at first glance appears to be a sampler—albeit a dazzling one—of the master's work. Upon closer examination, however, the reader discovers the book to be a subtly and organically unified self-revelation.

Dreamtigers explores the mysterious territory that lies between the dreams of the creative artist and the "real" world. The central vision of the work is that of a recluse in the "enveloping serenity" of a library, looking ahead to the time when he will have disappeared but in the timeless world of his books will continue his dialogue with the immortals of the past — Homer, Don Quixote, Shakespeare. Like Homer, the maker of these dreams is afflicted with failing sight. Still, he dreams of tigers real and imagined and reflects upon of a life that, above all, has been intensely introspective, a life of calm self-possession and absorption in the world of the imagination. At the same time he is keenly aware of that other Borges, the public figure about whom he reads with mixed emotions: "It's the other one, it's Borges, that things happen to."

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Jim53 - LibraryThing

Borges gives us short sections of brief prose meditations/stories and poems. In both sections, he gives us some obvious hints as to what he's up to, but more is hidden. I read several pieces four and ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JimElkins - LibraryThing

Borges is always said to be immersed in literature, to be a product of literature itself, and he certainly imagines himself that way. But is "literature" the right word for what crowds his imagination ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
9
To Leopoldo Lugones
21
The Draped Mirrors
27
Parable of Cervantes and Don Quixote
42
Elvira de Alvear
62
Copyright

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About the author (1985)

First published in Buenos Aires in 1960 as El Hacedor, Dreamtigers was translated into English by Mildred Boyer, professor emerita of romance languages at the University of Texas at Austin, and the poet Harold Morland. The late Miguel Enguídanos,

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