English in Language Shift: The History, Structure and Sociolinguistics of South African Indian English

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Jun 1, 2006 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 276 pages
0 Reviews
Rajend Mesthrie examines the rise of a new variety of English among Indian migrant workers indentured on the plantations of Natal in South Africa. Considering the historical background to, and linguistic consequences of, language shift in an immigrant context, he draws significant parallels between second language acquisition and the processes of pidginisation and creolisation. South African Indian English is compared with other dialects in South Africa, with English in India, and with Englishes generally.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

the shaping of a New English
1
a first glimpse
34
the relative clause
71
4 Wordorder principles
101
5 Nonsyntactic variation
128
6 Perspectives from secondlanguage acquisition
152
7 Perspectives from pidgin and Creole studies
183
Appendix A Comparison between SAIE sample and census data for Indians in Natal
222
Appendix B Types of relative clauses used by individual speakers
224
Appendix C Rank orders for relative clauses topics and morphology
229
Notes
233
Sources and references
237
Index
248
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2006)

Rajend Mesthrie is Professor of Linguistics at the University of South Africa. He has researched and published extensively on a range of contact phenomena in South Africa.

Bibliographic information