Introduction to Criminology: Theories, Methods, and Criminal Behavior

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SAGE, Jan 15, 2010 - Social Science - 553 pages
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Designed for introductory undergraduate courses in two- and four-year programs, Introduction to Criminology, 7th Edition is a streamlined, focused introduction to the study of criminology with more attention to crime typologies than other texts, plus Crime Files boxes that offer real-world, well-known examples of the crime types discussed. Written by an active researcher, this student-praised text covers the basic criminological theories, including expanded material on psychosocial and biosocial theories, and a new chapter on computer crime. The full-color design and a new just-in-time learning enhancement—margin notes that link students to online learning materials at appropriate points in the chapters—bring the text to life for students visually and virtually.
 

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About the author (2010)

Frank E. Hagan is a native of the North Side of Pittsburgh and has earned degrees at Gannon, Maryland and Case Western Reserve. He is the Director of the James V. Kinnane Graduate Program in Administration of Justice and is the author of eight books. These are Deviance and the Family (with Marvin B. Sussman), Introduction to Criminology (7th edition), Crime Types and Criminals, Research Methods in Criminal Justice and Criminology (8th edition), Essentials of Research Methods in Criminal Justice, Political Crime, White Collar Deviance (with David Simon), and The Language of Research (with Pamela Tontodonato).
He is also the author or coauthor of many journal articles and articles in edited volumes. Hagan is a recipient of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences Fellow Award (2000), and awarded the Teacher's Excellence Award by Mercyhurst College in 2006. His major interests are research methods, criminology and organized crime, white collar crime and terrorism.

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