Linguistics: An Introduction to Language and Communication

Front Cover
MIT Press, 2001 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 604 pages
2 Reviews
This popular introductory linguistics text is unique in the way various themes are integrated throughout the book. One primary theme is the question, "How is a speaker's communicative intent recognized?" Rather than treat phonology, phonetics, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics as completely separate fields, the text shows how they interact in principled ways. Similarly, language variation and acquisition are informed by results in these fields. The text provides a sound introduction to linguistic methodology while also revealing why people are intrinsically interested in language—the ultimate puzzle of the human mind.

The fifth edition has been thoroughly revised. Revisions include, but are not limited to, the addition of "selected readings" sections, updated examples, new discussion on the creative nature of neologisms, and the use of IPA as the primary transcription system throughout. This edition also includes an account of the patterns of occurrence of reduced vowels in English. An understanding of these patterns enables the reader to write a phonemic transcription of any English word.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Exellect textbook

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

definition of speech

Contents

Chapter
7
The Study of the Structure of Words
11
More on Compounds
50
Chapter 3
65
Vowels before j
99
Chapter 5
149
Sentence Structure and Anaphora
213
Chapter 6
227
INTRODUCTION
357
Speech Acts
394
Chapter 10
417
The McGurk Effect
454
Chapter 11
477
Compared
506
Chapter 12
527
EventRelated Potentials
550

Mood and Meaning
249
Language Variation
275
Chapter 8
315
Glossary
571
Index
591
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2001)

The late Adrian Akmajian was Professor of Linguistics at the University of Arizona.

Richard A. Demers is Professor Emeritus of the Department of Linguistics at the University of Arizona.

Ann K. Farmer is an Information Engineer at Google.

Robert M. Harnish is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy and Linguistics at the University of Arizona.

Bibliographic information