Mahar, Buddhist, and Dalit: Religious Conversion and Socio-political Emancipation

Front Cover
Manohar Publishers & Distributors, 2005 - Buddhism - 309 pages
1 Review
Bhimrao Ambedkar, born in a Mahar (untouchable caste) family converted to Buddhism at Nagpur in Maharashtra in 1956. Buddhism was for him the only religion which could solve the problems of social inequality and caste. Thousands of untouchables in the state in support followed his example against their social exclusion. Today almost the majority of the Mahars (more than 5 million) consider themselves Buddhists. The objective of this book is to analyse the discourses, representations, ritual practices and institutions of this community. Two aspects of the conversion are to be distinguished: one, the attempt of the Mahar community to achieve social ascension and emancipation; and the other, a project of reform which addresses the Indian society in its totality. The traditional hierarchical and unequal social Hindu order is opposed by a Buddhist alternative of a society based on equality, justice and progress. Analysing discursive situations and interactions of Buddhists with other social groups, the author argues that Buddhism should be viewed more as an open camp of discursive practices than a fixed system of religious beliefs or dogmas. The paradoxes and the singularity of this type of Buddhism seems to challenge the very category of Buddhism itself.

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Dr. Ambedkar is sun in Newbuddhists(Dalits) life: Prof. Sarjerao Borade I think, Dr. B.R. Ambedkar's born is very important part in Dalit's life. Dalit's was belongings to the Untouchable Communities. They had lived lack of suasion. There was call to MAHAR, this ‘manning of the all of lost’. They were fowling to Hindu Religion, but Hindu Brahmin and other upper castes or Varna didn't understand. Hinduism is every wronged ways, there are Varna system, Education right only for Brahmin caste, Women's blow suasion, Mahars caste was not right to Educational, Relegation, political, social in Hinduism. There were many limitation of Dalits daily life' that whey they were living in out of the villages. Hindu didn't give to water in rivers, wells and dames, its water drink had right to all animal and bards, but Mahars caste didn't right of touch to water. It was very bade suasion in Mahar caste life. That time Dalits was have to need remove to in condition.
Dr. Amedkar has born to 14th April 1891 in Mahu, Madhya Pradesh, India. His name of Bhimrao Ramji Sapakal. But his Ambawadekar school teacher was changed to Bhimrao's surname of Ambedkar. He had educated parson. He had lot of knowledge; he made the constitution of India, it’s very Large and best of in the world. There are many rights. freedoms and duty's equal for all Indian citizens in the constitution. Dr. Amedkar had a socialist person; he had only cared his Dalits communities. He was gathering the Dalit people and encaging to the fight of Hinduism bade thinking. But this fight didn't effect on Hindu’s upper communities. That whey Dalits moment way should have changed. Dalits moment didn't interest of Hinduism reformed. Dr. Ambedkar had taken oaths '' I born in Hindu Religion but I didn't die in Hindu Religion." It's meaning we(Dalits) shall changing to Religion.
Dr. Ambedkar was studying some world Religions, after he dissuaded to the Buddhism has best of in world Religion. It is Indian Religion and it’s depend on scientific though. Buddhism is human being Religion, there are social equality in Buddhism. That whey Dr. Ambedkar has accepted to Siddhartha Gautama Buddha's Religion of Buddhism for Mahar caste (Dalits) Communities. Those whey Dalit communities say Buddhism is our new birth and Dr. Ambedkar is father of Dalit Communities. Dr. B.R. Ambedkar is sun of Newbuddhist. Ambedkar contribution will be given every time sun light of Social Work that whey every human will be mead a power full and give to contribution for social develop India.
Prof. Sarjerao.N.Borade, Sociology
email sar.borade@gmail.com
 

Bibliographic information