Manufacturing Knowledge: A History of the Hawthorne Experiments

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Cambridge University Press, May 28, 1993 - Business & Economics - 282 pages
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What motivates workers to work harder? What can management do to create a contented and productive workforce? Discussion of these questions would be incomplete without reference to the Hawthorne experiments, one of the most famous pieces of research ever conducted in the social and behavioral sciences. Drawing on the original records of the experiments and the personal papers of the researchers, Richard Gillespie has reconstructed the intellectual and political dynamics of the experiments as they evolved from the tentative experimentation to seemingly authoritative publications. Manufacturing Knowledge raises fundamental questions about the nature of scientific knowledge, and about the assumptions and evidence that underlay debates on worker productivity.
 

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Manufacturing knowledge: a history of the Hawthorne experiments

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This is a scholarly, detailed, historical analysis of the famous 1924-1933 Hawthorne experiments and the literature of criticism and commentary that followed the initial accounts. Gillespie argues ... Read full review

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Contents

IV
7
V
8
VI
11
VII
16
VIII
27
IX
37
X
38
XI
48
XXIV
143
XXV
152
XXVI
153
XXVII
158
XXVIII
168
XXIX
175
XXX
176
XXXI
180

XII
56
XIII
64
XIV
69
XV
70
XVI
76
XVII
89
XVIII
96
XIX
97
XX
100
XXI
112
XXII
127
XXIII
128
XXXII
190
XXXIII
196
XXXIV
210
XXXV
211
XXXVI
227
XXXVII
240
XXXVIII
241
XXXIX
264
XL
272
XLI
274
XLII
277
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