Methods of Teaching Geography: Notes of Lessons. Printed at the Request of the Teachers in Attendance

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Boston School supply Company, 1903 - Geography - 71 pages
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Page 11 - I RECENTLY observed a lesson in preliminary geography in a second year grade. The outline of work for the year was somewhat as follows : — LESSONS ON ANIMALS — That live on the land ; in the water ; in the air. That live in hot parts of the earth; in cold parts ; in forests; in plains ; in deserts ; on mountains, etc. VEGETATION — Same as animals. PEOPLE — Their kinds of homes. What they wear, eat, and do. The animals they use. The distance and direction of their homes from the pupils
Page 70 - ... of the reproductions of the press of W. Caxton. NY 1879. 8. . Memoranda relating to the early press of Iowa, at Iowa City and Dubuque. Iowa C., 1880. Pam. Springer, Mrs. CF Collection of correspondence, foreign and Am. 1878-82. . Red, white and blue, a poem. 1879. Statesman's Year Book. Statistical and historical annual of the States of the civilized world'. Lond., 1883. 12".
Page 5 - Geography, well taught, is an educational study cultivating the imagination and judgment, as well as the memory; training the mind in both observation and language. Perhaps no other branch in the grammar school curriculum gives opportunity for culture in so many directions. And there is no subject taught in which it is more necessary for the teacher to be independent of the text-book, especially in the arrangement of lessons and in the appointment of time according to the relative importance...
Page 10 - I. Lessons on Place (including Relative Position, Direction, and Distance). 1. (a). Illustrations of the use of the prepositions of place ; as on, above, before, between, under, below, behind, around, etc. Method. By placing objects. The teacher places the pupil imitates. The teacher places the pupil describes. The teacher dictates .... the pupil places. The teacher disarranges . . the pupil rearranges from memory.
Page 80 - Their success in accomplishing this much desired end is fully attested by the high commendations of teachers from all sections of the country. Each globe is accompanied with a printed manual of 30 pages, giving a complete description of the globe and its various uses, with illustrative problems.
Page 6 - ... and language. Perhaps no other branch in the grammar school curriculum gives opportunity for culture in so many directions. And there is no subject taught in which it is more necessary for the teacher to be independent of the text-book, especially in the arrangement of lessons and in the appointment of time according to the relative importance of the parts of the subject.
Page 76 - This style, with black walnut horizon, graduated full brass meridian, hour dial, etc., is mounted upon a light bronzed stand of neat and appropriate design. The arms which support the horizon are pivoted to the base, thus allowing any portion of the globe to be turned to the student without changing the position of the base itself, — a very desirable arrangement.
Page 73 - In this manner, the globe is brought to a convenient height for use while sitting, and, at the same time, presents an ornamental appearance adapting it to the parlor and library, as well as to the school-room. It is furnished with horizon, graduated full brass nickel-plated meridian, hour dial, etc.
Page 6 - ... than the places they occupy upon the map. Are we to have definitions accurately stated? Certainly ; but only when the thing to be defined, and the language that expresses the definition, are clearly comprehended.
Page 25 - In the second year, the children will be ready to take up such general study of the countries of each grand division as is adapted to their age. This study will be more interesting and useful if still largely oral, with such explanation of the text that the children may catch its full meaning before attempting to read it for themselves. The teacher may think it wise to take very early in this course the study of our own vicinity, and state,1...

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