Nature cure

Front Cover
Nature Cure Publishing, 1914 - 438 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
7
II
13
III
17
IV
24
V
32
VI
46
VII
55
VIII
63
XXIII
241
XXIV
250
XXV
256
XXVI
271
XXVII
290
XXVIII
301
XXIX
312
XXX
324

IX
77
X
95
XI
102
XII
106
XIII
115
XIV
125
XV
154
XVI
169
XVII
181
XVIII
191
XIX
198
XX
203
XXI
214
XXII
226
XXXI
330
XXXII
342
XXXIII
354
XXXIV
368
XXXV
378
XXXVI
385
XXXVII
390
XXXVIII
393
XXXIX
398
XL
408
XLI
414
XLII
419
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 409 - For whosoever hath, to him shall be given, and he shall have more abundance: but whosoever hath not, from him shall be taken away even that he hath.
Page 225 - Whoever thinks from an enlightened rationale, may see and perceive from this that a man cannot be regenerated without combat, that is, without spiritual temptations; and further, that he is not regenerated by one temptation, but by many. For there are very many kinds of evil which formed the delight of his former life, that is, of the old life. These evils cannot all be subdued at once and together; for they cleave tenaciously, since they have been inrooted in the parents for many ages back...
Page 29 - Nature Cure Philosophy presents a rational concept of evil, its cause and purpose, namely: that it is brought on by violation of Nature's laws, that it is corrective in its purpose that it can be overcome only by compliance with the Law. There is no suffering, disease or evil of any kind anywhere unless the law has been transgressed somewhere by someone.
Page 127 - Treatment A plentiful supply of pure fresh air is of vital importance at any time. We can live without food for several weeks and without water for several days, but we cannot live without air for more than a few minutes. Just as a fire in the furnace cannot be kept up without a good draft...
Page 155 - At the outset of the nineteenth century it was treated with 'remedies' of the extremest violence, — bleeding and blistering, vomiting and purging, and the administration of antimony and mercury, and plenty of other heroic remedies. Now the patient is bathed and nursed and carefully tended, but rarely given medicine. This is the result partly of the remarkable experiments of the Paris and Vienna schools...
Page 28 - Health is normal and harmonious vibration of the elements and forces composing the human entity on the physical, mental, moral, and spiritual planes of being, in conformity with the constructive principle of Nature applied to individual life." "Disease is abnormal or inharmonious vibration of the elements and forces composing the human entity on one or more planes of being, in conformity with the destructive principle of Nature applied to individual life.
Page 254 - Gazing straight into the owl's large, bright eyes, he noticed, at the moment when the bone snapped, the appearance of a black spot in the lower central region of the iris, which area he later found to correspond to the location of the broken leg.
Page 19 - MD, voiced the same doctrine in these words: — "Every acute disease is the result of a cleansing and healing effort of Nature (p. 55) ... All acute diseases are uniform in their causes, their purpose, and, if conditions are favorable, uniform also in their progressive development ..." (Nature Cure, 20th Edition, 1922). When the nervous system and the reactive forces become adjusted to the pent-up poisons, there is a state...
Page 154 - The new school does not feel itself under obligation to give any medicines whatever, while a generation ago not only could few physicians have held their practice unless they did, but few would have thought it safe or scientific. Of course, there are still many cases where the patient or the patient's friends must be humored by administering medicine or alleged medicine where it is not really needed, and indeed often where the buoyancy of mind which is the real curative agent, can only be created...
Page 101 - Be careful how you give Mercury; it is a treacherous medicine. It seems often indicated. You give it and relieve; but your patient is worse again in a few weeks and then you give it again with relief. By and by, it fails you. Now, if I want to make a permanent cure, for instance, in a scrofulous child, I will very seldom give him Mercury; should I do so, it will be at least only as an intercurrent remedy.

Bibliographic information