New Methods of Food Preservation

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Dec 31, 1995 - Technology & Engineering - 324 pages
2 Reviews
This book describes in detail those new and emerging food preservation techniques that are now, or soon will be, commerically exploited. The editor, a leading figure in this field, has assembled a team of well-known and respected contributors, who cover chemical, biological and physically based-approaches. Emphasis is placed both on the innovative exploitation of traditional procedures, including combination preservation methods, and on more radical approaches, such as the use of high hydrostatic pressures or voltage pulses to inactivate microorganisms in food, and the direct and synergistic application of ultrasonic radiation.
 

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a great summer read
lounge in your bathing suit, in a sun chair, by the beach, cool ocean breeze and soak in this book
a must for the up and coming organic produce buying, whole food loving, yoga intense mom

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perfect book

Contents

Principles and applications of hurdle technology
1
121 Fermented foods
3
122 Shelf stable products SSP
5
13 Behaviour of microorganisms during food preservation
8
132 Multitarget preservation of foods
9
14 Total quality of foods
10
141 Optimal range of hurdles
11
142 Potential safety and quality hurdles
12
745 Process control
150
75 The challenges of the commercial application of high pressure technology in the food industry
151
752 Economical and commercial challenges
156
76 Outlook
157
Acknowledgements
158
Hydrostatic pressure treatment of food microbiology
159
82 Current applications
160
83 Pressure effects on microorganisms
162

15 Application of hurdle technology in less developed countries
15
152 Dairy product of India
17
153 Meat products of Ch ina
18
16 Future potential
19
References
20
Bacteriocins natural antimicrobials from microorganisms
22
211 Historical
23
222 Small heatstable bacteriocins
26
223 Large heatlabile bacteriocins
28
23 Genetics of bacteriocins from LAB
29
232 Genetic location of bacteriocin genes
31
241 Dairy industry
32
242 Canning industry
34
244 Wine and beer
35
25 Future prospects for bacteriocins
36
References
38
Natural antimicrobials from animals
40
32 The phagosome
44
33 Antibiotic peptides
45
332 Chemical attributes and spectrum of action
46
34 Protein amendment and production of antibiotic peptides
49
341 Iron
50
342 Avidin
51
35 The lactoperoxidase system LPS
52
36 Lysozymes
53
37 Prospects
54
References
55
Natural antimicrobials from plants
58
42 Phytoalexins
59
43 Organic acids
60
45 Phenolics pigments and related compounds
67
451 Factors affecting antimicrobial action
75
46 Modes of action
77
47 Health and legislative aspects
81
48 Conclusions
82
References
83
Food irradiation current status and future prospects
90
53 Technical advantages and limitations of food irradiation
91
531 Technoeconomic advantages
92
54 Limitations of food irradiation
98
542 Infrastructure and economics
99
55 Consumer acceptance of irradiated food
100
552 Market testings and retail sales of irradiated food
102
56 Commercial application of food irradiation
103
57 International cooperation in the field of food irradiation
105
571 Cooperation between FAO IAEA and WHO
106
572 Cooperation with the Codex Alimentarius Commission CAC
107
573 Cooperation leading to international trade in irradiated food
108
58 Conclusions
109
Microwave processing
112
62 Introduction to microwaves and their interaction with food materials
113
622 How microwaves heat
114
623 Power absorption
115
625 Material properties
116
63 Microwaves and microorganisms
117
631 Early work 194055
118
633 Conclusion
120
642 Current status of microwave processing in food industry applications
121
643 Microwave patents in preservation
122
65 Case histories
123
Case history 2 Drying of pharmaceuticals
125
Case History 3 Pasteurisation of fruit and sugar mixture
127
Case History 4 Sterilisation after packaging of pasta products
128
Case History 5 Pilot plant microwave steriliser
129
66 The future
133
Hydrostatic pressure treatment of food equipment and processing
135
72 General description of an industrial high pressure system
136
722 Pressure generation
139
723 Temperature control
142
724 Material handling
143
73 Current commercial applications of high pressure technology
144
732 Quartz growing
145
733 Chemical reactors
146
time temperature and pressure
147
744 Fast cycling in combination with three shifts per day 300 days per year operation
149
832 Pressure inactivation of vegetative cells in food systems
164
833 Pressure effects on bacterial spores
166
84 Combination treatments
167
85 Conclusions
172
Effect of heat and ultrasound on microorganisms and enzymes
176
911 Heat inaclivation of microorganisms and enzymes
177
912 Destructive effect of ultrasound waves on microorganisms and enzymes
182
ManoThermoSonication MTS
190
921 Effects of MTS on microorganisms
192
922 Effect of MTS on enzymes
195
93 Conclusions
199
References
200
Electrical resistance heating of foods
205
electrical resistance heating
207
1013 APV Baker ohmic heater
209
1014 Preservation by electrical heating
210
102 The physics of electrical heating
211
1022 Thermal properties of foods
215
103 Models for electrical heating
216
1032 Eleclrical conductivity of solidliquid mixtures
217
1033 Flow and heat transfer
219
1034 Holding and cooling sections
224
104 Electrically processed foods
225
1042 Enhanced diffusion in electrical processing
226
1043 Differences between diffusion in conventional and electrically processed foods
228
105 Conclusions
231
Acknowledgements
232
Nomenclature
234
Highvoltage pulse techniques for food preservation
236
a historical review
237
113 The Elsteril Process
242
114 Influence of highvoltage pulses on microorganisms
244
115 The influence of electric highvoltage pulses on food ingredients
247
116 Mathematical modelling of cell count reduction
248
117 Conclusions
250
Preservation by microbial decontamination the surface treatment of meats by organic acids
253
122 Critical control points in carcass contamination
254
equipment and utensils
255
the slaughter personnel
256
123 Organic acids as meat decontaminants
257
1232 Factors influencing the efficacy of meat decontamination by acids
259
124 Effects of acid treatment on sensory properties
268
1242 Effects on flavour and odour
270
1243 Effects on drip loss
271
125 Mode of application of acids technologies available
272
1252 Immersion
274
1253 Other methods
276
126 Acceptability of acid treatment
277
Acknowledgements
278
Advances and potential for aseptic processing
283
132 Regulatory effects
284
133 Aspects of good manufacturing praclice
285
134 GMP guidelines
289
1351 Food contact surfaces
291
1353 Nonfood contact surfaces
293
1355 Aseptic filling zone
294
136 Commissioning tests
295
137 Manufacturing directive
296
1381 Bulk packaging
298
139 Conclusions
300
References
301
Advances in modifiedatmosphere packaging
304
1411 Role of gases
305
142 Market status and potential
306
143 Microbiology of MAP
308
1432 Microbial safety
310
1434 Other pathogens
311
144 Developments in MAP
312
1442 Predictivemathematical modelling
315
1443 Combination treatments
316
1445 Indicators
317
Acknowledgement
318
Index
321
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