Nova Express

Front Cover
Grove/Atlantic, Inc., Feb 24, 2011 - Fiction - 192 pages
7 Reviews
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The Soft Machine introduced us to the conditions of a universe where endemic lusts of the mind and body pray upon men, hook them, and turn them into beasts. Nova Express takes William S. Burroughs’s nightmarish futuristic tale one step further. The diabolical Nova Criminals—Sammy The Butcher, Green Tony, Iron Claws, The Brown Artist, Jacky Blue Note, Izzy The Push, to name only a few—have gained control and plan on wreaking untold destruction. It’s up to Inspector Lee of the Nova Police to attack and dismantle the word and imagery machine of these “control addicts” before it’s too late. This surrealist novel is part sci-fi, part Swiftian parody, and always pure Burroughs.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JWarren42 - LibraryThing

It's insanity doesn't quite sparkle to use a bad phrase like the other two. Though the WORD virus is complete here, and The Subliminal Kid has won, the text just seems more flat than the others. The ... Read full review

NOVA EXPRESS

User Review  - Kirkus

echauffe. From the French, meaning a dish of food warmed over, a reash. Exit the Naked Lunch disguised as the Nova Express. Chef william Burroughs presents the menu. Soupe de jour sputters on and out ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Last Words
3
So Pack Your Ermines
17
Chinese Laundry
35
Crab Nebula
69
From a Land of Grass Without Mirrors
91
Gave Proof Through the Night
119
This Horrible Case
133
Pay Color
147
Copyright

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 4 - What scared you all into time? Into body? Into shit? I will tell you: "the word." Alien Word "the." "The" word of Alien Enemy imprisons "thee" in Time. In Body. In Shit. Prisoner, come out. The great skies are open. I Hassan i Sabbah rub out the word forever.
Page 4 - Are these the words of the all-powerful boards and syndicates of the earth? These are the words of liars cowards collaborators traitors. Liars who want time for more lies. Cowards who can not face your 'dogs' your 'gooks' your 'errand boys' your 'human animals' with the truth. Collaborators with Insect People with Vegetable People. With any people anywhere who offer you a body forever. To shit forever.
Page 3 - LISTEN TO MY LAST WORDS anywhere. Listen to my last words any world. Listen all you boards syndicates and governments of the earth. And you powers behind what filth deals consummated in what lavatory to take what is not yours. To sell the ground from unborn feet forever — "Don't let them see us.
Page 5 - Bring together state of news. Inquire onward from state to doer. Who monopolized Immortality? Who monopolized Cosmic Consciousness? Who monopolized Love sex and dream? Who monopolized life time and fortune? Who took from you what is yours? Now they will give it all back? Did they ever give anything away for nothing?
Page 7 - Anybody is a coward when faced by the nova ovens — There are degrees of lying collaboration and cowardice — That is to say degrees of intoxication — It is precisely a question of regulation — The enemy is not man is not woman — The enemy exists only where no life is and moves always to push life into extreme untenable positions — You can cut the enemy off your line by the judicious use of apomorphine and silence- — Use the sanity drug apomorphine.
Page 5 - He wants to take your body and all pleasures of the body away from you. Listen to us. We are serving The Garden of Delights Immortality Cosmic Consciousness The Best Ever In Drug Kicks. And love love love in slop buckets.

About the author (2011)

From hipster to so-called Godfather of Punk, William Burroughs has lived a controversial life as a leading member of the Beat Generation and a daring writer of psychedelic literary experiments, but, when he reached his seventieth birthday in 1984, it was almost as if he had been overtaken by respectability. Burroughs was born in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1914 as the grandson of the man who invented the adding machine and a descendant of Robert E. Lee of Civil War fame. He attended Harvard University. Later while living a bohemian life in association with such Beat writers as Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac, Burroughs became addicted to morphine and under the pseudonym William Lee published his first novel, Junkie, in 1953 as half of an Ace Double Books paperback. The novel escaped critical notice but may be seen now as the forerunner of his later fiction with its introduction of many of the themes, settings, characters, and amoral postures that became prominent with Naked Lunch (1959) and its successors. Refused by the American publishers to whom Burroughs submitted the manuscript, Naked Lunch first appeared in Paris under the Olympia Press imprint in 1959, the same year that Burroughs was permanently cured of his addiction. Naked Lunch might have remained ignored had not Mary McCarthy and Norman Mailer called attention to the work at the International Writers Conference held in Edinburgh in 1962. Burroughs's raw subject matter and seeming lack of discipline have alienated some of the more academic and genteel literary critics. Naked Lunch was followed by three additional novels about the Nova crime syndicate-The Soft Machine (1961), The Ticket That Exploded (1962), and Nova Express (1964), which make use of overlapping characters and motifs. With The Wild Boys of 1971, Burroughs began to develop a new style more accessible to the general reader. Although Cities of the Red Night (1981) received mixed reviews, it was praised by such Burroughs experts as Jennie Skerl and Robert Burkholder as perhaps the best of his more recent novels. Of The Place of Dead Roads (1983) is true to Burroughs's various obsessions with guns, homosexuality, and the terror produced by people who are addicted to power and control. Today much of the psychedelic effect of Burroughs's fiction appears to be an illusion that masks rather deliberate methods of composition. These include "cut-out" techniques, pastiche, and the deliberate trying-out of styles derived from popular fiction genres to create literary montages that owe as much to fantasy and science as to the surrealism of avant-garde literature.

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