On the Origin of Species

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Broadview Press, Mar 28, 2003 - History - 672 pages

Charles Darwin’s On The Origin of Species, in which he writes of his theories of evolution by natural selection, is one of the most important works of scientific study ever published.

This unabridged edition also includes a rich selection of primary source material: substantial selections from Darwin’s other works (Autobiography, notebooks, letters, Voyage of the Beagle, and The Descent of Man) and selections from Darwin’s sources and contemporaries (excerpts from Genesis, Paley, Lamarck, Spencer, Lyell, Malthus, Huxley, and Wallace).

 

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I found an English copy of this book in a "Book Garage Sale" several years ago. I had heard about the book, but before this had never read it for myself. A few things about the book itself:
#1
. It is an amazingly simple book, for those of us who have been taught "Darwinian Evolution" in Science Classes our whole lives. It is thoroughly understandably for the layman.
#2. It is courteous and friendly in it's demeanor, but read in today's context, it is a
COMPLETELY RACIST BOOK, ARGUING A THOROUGHLY RACIST PHILOSOPHY, NOT REAL SCIENCE, as we know and think of it today. This is hidden by the shortening of the treatise title from "On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life)" to "On the Origins of the Species". Yes, he says in a book written over 10 years later, that he did not mention Human Races and some races preservation over other races preservation, because his views would not have been accepted and "Origins" would not have been published.
#3. It is an honest inquiry into some observations in the World, with some honest personal answers.Darwin states honestly that if the interior construction of the single human cell ( which he could not observe during his time period) was someday found to be complex in nature and not simple, then this theory of Evolution would be false and disproved. Amazingly, this part of his "Great Discoveries" was never taught to us in Middle School and High School Science Classes.
 

Contents

Acknowledgments
Recommendations for Further Reading
Works Cited and Source Texts
A Brief Chronology
An Historical Sketch of the Progress of Opinion on
Text
From The Autobiography of Charles Darwin
From Voyage of the Beagle Excerpts from Journal
Letters
Thomas Henry Huxley on the Historical Situation of
From The Descent of Man and Selection
Contextual Materials
Wallace On the Tendency of Varieties to Depart
Register of Names
Index to the Introduction Darwins Historical Sketch and
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Joseph Carroll a Professor at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, has published widely on Darwin and his influence.

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