Principles of Elocution: Containing Numerous Rules, Observations, and Exercises on Pronunciation, Pauses, Inflections, Accent and Emphasis, Also Copious Extracts in Prose and Poetry

Front Cover
Oliver & Boyd, 1832
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Lochinvar
63
From Lalla Rookh
64
Scene after the Siege of Corinth
65
The Burial of Sir John Moore
68
Mary the Maid of the Inn
70
The Siege of Corinth
73
The American Patriots Song
75
The Curse
77
The Gladiator
78
The Dying Chief
80
The Field of Gilboa
81
A Nightpiece on Death
82
The Shield
83
Loudhons Attack
84
William Penn Nathan and the Bailiff
86
MISCELLANEOUS LESSONS 1 On the Dissolution of Nature
87
The Balance of Happiness equal
88
The Interview of Rasselas c with the Hermit
89
On the Improvement of Time
91
The Hill of Science
93
Patience Recommended
94
The Planetary and Terrestrial Worlds
95
The Italian Opera
97
WestminsterAbbey
100
On Consistency in Behaviour
101
Interview between an Old Major and a Young Officer
103
On Religion
104
Remarks on the Swiftness of Time
105
On Public Preaching
108
How a Modern Lady of Fashion disposes of her Time
109
On Pronunciation or Delivery HI 18 Discontent the common Lot of all Mankind
112
The Funeral of Mr Betterton
114
The Folly of mispending Time
117
The Vision of Sir Isaac Bickerstaff
118
Youth and Old Age
120
The Poor weep unheeded
121
The Story of a Disabled Soldier
122
The Business and Qualifications of a Poet
125
Remarks on some of the best Poets
127
On the Iliad of Homer
129
On the Odyssey of Homer
131
On the comparative Merit of Homer and Virgil
132
On Human Grandeur
133
Ethelgar A Saxon Poem
135
Kenrick Translated from the Saxon
138
Hard Words defended
139
The Difficulty of conquering Habit
142
On Cruelty to inferior Animals
143
Effects of Sympathy in the Distresses of Others
144
On the Love of Life
146
On the Dignity of Human Nature
147
Fame a commendable Passion
148
The present Life to be considered only as it may conduce to the Happiness of a future one
149
Luxury and Avarice
152
The Impudent and the Absurd
154
On Grieving for the Dead
156
On Remorse
157
On the increased Love of Life with Age
158
47 Asem An Eastern Tale
160
On the English Clergy and Popular Preachers
162
On Universal Benevolence
164
On the Advantages of a wellcultivated Mind
167
On the Formation of Language
170
On the Sublime in Writing
173
HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL EXTRACTS 1 Our natural Fondness for History and its true Use
177
On Biography
178
Character of Queen Elizabeth
179
Character of Mr Pitt
181
The Siege of Quebec and the Death of General Wolfe
183
The Character of Julius Ciesar
185
7 The Character of Cato
186
A Comparison ofCasar with Cato
187
The Character of Mary Queen of Scots
188
PATHETIC EXTRACTS 1 Reyno and Alpin
190
On Military Glory
191
The Dead Ass
192
Maria Parti
194
Maria Part II
195
True Pleasure denned
198
The Condition of the Wicked
199
On Charity
200
Religious Knowledge a Source of Consolation
201
fi On the Enlargement of our Intellectual Powers
203
On a Future State
205
On the Works and Attributes of the Almighty
207
The Birth of the Saviour announced
208
The Truth frees us from the slavish Fear of Death
209
On the Hope of Immortality
211
The departed Spirits of the Just are Spectators of our Conduct on Earth
212
The Death of Christ
213
On Continuance in Welldoing
214
17 On the General Fast 1803
215
The Promises of Religion to the Young
217
On Autumn
218
Funeral Eulogium on Dr Franklin
220
General Wolfe to his Army
221
Speech of Mr Horace Walpole
222
Mr Pitts Reply
223
Lord Ly tteltons Speech on the Repeal of the Act called the Jew Bill224
224
ft Sir John St Aubins Speech for Repealing the Septennial Act
226
Sir Robert Walpoles Reply
228
Mr Pulteneys Speech on the Motion for Reducing the Army
230
Speech of Lord Chatham
233
Speech of the Earl of Chesterfield
236
The Speech of a Roman Officer to his Soldiers
241
Speech of Charidemus to Darius
242
The Scythian Ambassadors to Alexander
243
The Beginning of the First Philippic of Demosthenes
245
ft The Battle of Busaco
261
The Visions of Fancy
262
Confidence in God
263
Boadicea An Ode
264
Hope the Friend of the Brave
265
The Moral Change anticipated by Hope
266
The Anticipations of Hope
268
The Influence of Hope at the Close of Life
269
On the Effects of Time and Change
270
On True Dignity
271
The First Two Verses of Marmion
272
The Death of Marmion
273
On the Arrival of the British Army in Portugal
274
From the Bride of Abydos
275
On Ancient Greece
276
Sarpedon to Glaucus
277
Alexander the Great 27B 26 Lines written on visiting a Scene in Argyleshire
278
Part of a Poem on the Fear of God
279
2a The last Speech of Cyrus
280
A Ladys Salutation to her Garden in the Country
281
Davids Tiustin God
282
The Day of Judgment 384
284
The Benedicite Paraphrased
285
The Crow and the other Birds
286
The Two Owls and the Sparrow
287
Courage in Poverty
288
3a Epilogue by Mr Garrick
290
Awful Description of the Deities engaged in Combat
291
Harmony of Expression
292
On Man
293
Universal Order
295
SelfKnowledge
296
On the Plain of Marathon
297
On the Present State of Athens
298
The Lyre
300
The Battle of Vittoria
302
The Aspect of Greece
303
The Turkish Lady
304
A Ship Sinking
305
Battle of the Baltic
306
The Fate of Macgregor
308
The Temple of Fame
311
From the Field of Waterloo
319
BLANK VERSE 1 Against Suicide
321
Various Modes of Punishment
322
The Ideas of the Divine Mind c
323
On Slavery
324
That Philosophy which stops at Secondary Causes reproved
325
The Good Preacher and the Clerical Coxcomb
326
Cardinal Wolseys Speech to Cromwell
327
Character of Teribazus
328
A Seatonian Prize Poem
329
On the Importance of Time to Man
331
On Death
332
On the Being of a God
333
On the Wonders of Redemption
334
Lochiels Warning
336
Vanoc and Valens
339
Corin and Emmas Hospitality
341
Coriolanus and Aufidius
343
Lady Randolph and Douglas
345
Albertos Exculpation
347
Alfred and Devon
350
The Quarrel of Brutus and Cassius
351
Orestes delivering his Embassy to Pyrrhus
354
Glenalvon and Norval
356
Hector and Andromache
359
Catos Senate
360
Speech of Henry V at the Siege of Harfleur
363
Marcelluss Speech to the Mob
364
Richmond encouraging his Soldiers
365
B Henry V s Speech at Agincourt
366
Speech of Edward the Black Prince
367
How Douglas learned the Art of War
368
Othellos Apology
369
Cassius against Caesar
370
Alfreds Address to the Saxon Troops
372
Leonidas offering to defend the Pass of Thermopylae
373
Oration in Praise of Coriolanus
374
The Old English Lion
375
The Passions
376
Alexanders Feast
378
Speech of Rolla I
382
Osmonds Dream
383
Hamlets Advice to the Players
385
Lady Randolphs Soliloquy
386
Catos Soliloquy on the Immortality of the Soul
387
Hamlets Soliloquy on Death
388
Macbeths Soliloquy before Murdering Duncan
389
COMIC EXTRACTS 1 Prologue to the Farce of the Apprentice
390
Contest between the Nose and the Eyes
391
Lodgings for Single Gentlemen
392
Toby Tosspot
393
The Chameleon
394
The Newcastle Apothecary
396
THE PASSIONS 1 Cheerfulness
399
Raillery
400
Love
401
Pity
402
Anger
403
Revenge
404
Sorrow
405
Remorse
406
Surprise
407
Pride
408
Perplexity
409
Malice
410

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 370 - I cannot tell, what you and other men Think of this life; but, for my single self, I had as lief not be, as live to be In awe of such a thing as I m,yself.
Page 388 - The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely, The pangs of despised love, the law's delay, The insolence of office and the spurns That patient merit of the unworthy takes, When he himself might his quietus make, With a bare bodkin?
Page 399 - Now, my co-mates and brothers in exile, Hath not old custom made this life more sweet Than that of painted pomp? Are not these woods More free from peril than the envious court? Here feel we but the penalty of Adam, — The seasons...
Page 385 - Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus: but use all gently: for in the very torrent, tempest, and (as I may say) whirlwind of your passion, you must acquire and beget a temperance, that may give it smoothness.
Page 383 - Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his. If then that friend demand, why Brutus rose against Caesar, this is my answer,— Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more. Had you rather Caesar were living, and die all slaves; than that Caesar were dead, to live all...
Page 382 - Romans, countrymen, and lovers! hear me for my cause ; and be silent that you may hear : believe me for mine honour; and have respect to mine honour, that you may believe: censure me in your wisdom; and awake your senses that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar's, to him I say, that Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his.
Page 400 - Tis but an hour ago since it was nine, And after one hour more 'twill be eleven ; And so, from hour to hour, we ripe and ripe, And then, from hour to hour, we rot and rot ; And thereby hangs a tale.
Page 331 - Night, sable goddess ! from her ebon throne, In rayless majesty, now stretches forth Her leaden sceptre o'er a slumbering world. Silence how dead! and darkness how profound! Nor eye nor listening ear an object finds ; Creation sleeps. 'Tis as the general pulse Of life stood still, and Nature made a pause ; An awful pause! prophetic of her end.
Page 331 - The bell strikes one. We take no note of time, But from its loss. To give it then a tongue Is wise in man. As if an angel spoke, I feel the solemn sound. If heard aright, It is the, knell of my departed hours : Where are they?
Page 353 - You have done that you should be sorry for. There is no terror, Cassius, in your threats; For I am arm'd so strong in honesty, That they pass by me as the idle wind Which I respect not.

Bibliographic information