Russian Fairy Tales

Front Cover
Pantheon Books, 1975 - Fairy tales - 661 pages
5 Reviews

The most comprehensive collection of classic Russian tales available in English introduces readers to universal fairy-tale figures and to such uniquely Russian characters such as Koshchey the Deathless, Baba Yaga, the Swan Maiden, and the glorious Firebird. Beautifully illustrated, the more than 175 tales culled from a landmark multi-volume collection by the outstanding Russian ethnographer Aleksandr Afanas'ev reveal a rich, robust world of the imagination.

Translated by Norbert Guterman
Illustrated by Alexander Alexeieff
With black-and-white illustrations throughout
Part of the Pantheon Fairy Tale and Folklore Library

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - catya77 - LibraryThing

This is a collection Russian Fairy Tales. There is love, death, and betrayal, as with all good tales. The narrative is detailed, vivid, often emotional, and evocative. Characters are sometimes emotional, caring, and humorous. Overall, a fun read. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - suzemo - LibraryThing

This is the first book that made me fall in love with the Pantheon Fairy Tale Library. It's a collection of Russian Folk Tales, with a decent index and cute illustrations that go along with the stories. Read full review

Contents

The Wondrous Wonder the Marvelous Marvel
16
The Merchants Daughter and the Maidservant
17
Salt
41
The Three Kingdoms
54
The Crane and the Heron
67
The Magic Shirt
110
The Speedy Messenger
124
The Mayoress
141
The Bear
394
The OneEyed Evil
404
The Robbers
420
The Fox as Mourner
437
The Foolish Wolf
450
Dawn Evening and Midnight
463
Prince Ivan and Byely Polyanin
480
The Firebird and Princess Wasilisa
494

The Precious Hide
156
The Fox and the Woodcock
172
The Ram Who Lost Half His Skin
188
Right and Wrong
207
The Potter
208
Ivanko the Bears Son
221
Ivan the Cows Son
236
The Wolf and the Goat
249
Ivan the Peasants Son and the ThumbSized Man
262
The Sheep the Fox and the Wolf
275
The Peasant the Bear and the Fox
288
The Milk of Wild Beasts
304
The Bold Knight the Apples of Youth and the Water of Life 314
321
The Peasant and the Corpse 333
3-34
If You Dont Like It Dont Listen
3-49
The Princess Who Never Smiled
3-62
The Fox Confessor
375
The Cock and the Hand Mill
388
Two Kinds of Luck
501
The Cat the Cock and the
511
The Wise Wife
523
The Goldfish
529
The GoldenBristled Pig the GoldenFeathered Duck
540
Elena the Wise
546
Maria Morevna
553
The Soldier and the King
563
Ilya Muromets and the Dragon
569
The Devil Who Was a Potter
576
The Feather of Finist the Bright Falcon
582
The Sun the Moon and the Raven
588
The Vampire
596
The Foolish German
607
Shemiaka the Judge
625
Index
647
Copyright

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About the author (1975)

RIDDLES

Near a highway a peasant was sowing a field. Just then the tsar rode by, stopped near the peasant, and said: "Godspeed, little peasant!" "Thank you, my good man!" (He did not know he was speaking to the tsar.) "Do you earn much profit from this field?" "If the harvest is good, I may make eighty rubles." "What do you do with this money?" "Twenty rubles go for taxes, twenty go for debts, twenty I give in loans, and twenty I throw out of the window." "Explain to me, brother, what debts you must pay, to whom you loan money, and why you throw money out the window." "Supporting my father is paying a debt; feeding my son is lending money; feeding my daughter is throwing it out of the window" "You speak the truth," said the tsar. He gave the peasant a handful of silver coins, disclosed that he was the tsar, and forbade the man to tell these things to anyone outside of his presence: "No matter who asks you, do not answer!"

The tsar came to his capital and summoned his boyars and generals. "Solve this riddle," he said to them. "On my way I saw a peasant who was sowing a field. I asked him what profit he earned from it and what he did with his money. He answered that if the harvest was good he got eighty rubles, and that he paid out twenty rubles in taxes, twenty for debts, twenty as loans, and twenty he threw out of the window. To him who solves this riddle I will give great rewards and great honors." The boyars and generals thought and thought but could not solve the riddle. But one boyar hit upon the idea of going to the peasant with whom the tsar had spoken. He gave the peasant a whole pile of silver rubles and asked him: "Tell me the answer to the tsar's riddle." The peasant cast a glance at the money, took it, and explained everything to the boyar, who returned to the tsar and repeated the solution to the riddle.

The tsar realized that the peasant had not abided by the imperial command, and ordered that he be brought to court. The peasant appeared before the tsar and at once admitted he had told everything to the boyar. "Well, brother, for such an offense I must order you put to death, and you have only yourself to thank for it." "Your majesty, I am not guilty of any offense, because I told everything to the boyar in your presence." As he said this, the peasant drew from his pocket a silver ruble with the tsar's likeness on it, and showed it to the tsar. "You speak the truth," said the tsar. "This is my person." And he generously rewarded the peasant and sent him home.

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