Schizophrenia in a Molecular Age

Front Cover
American Psychiatric Pub, 1999 - Medical - 181 pages

Schizophrenia is a disease with unknown pathophysiology and etiology. Until recently, what was best known about this disease was derived from clinical observations. Preclinical neuroscience is flourishing with discoveries and advances in all areas of brain function, particularly the cellular and the molecular.

As a way to explain the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, Schizophrenia in a Molecular Age reviews neuroscience mechanisms and analyzes genetic determinants. This book presents: * A dimensional model of schizophrenia phenomenology that groups schizophrenia phenotypes into three groups: a reality distortion syndrome, a disorganization syndrome, and a psychomotor poverty syndrome* Evidence for the neurobiologic basis of the cognitive impairments in schizophrenia* New and evolving techniques of functional brain imaging and what they can tell us about normal brain function and its pathology* Data on the anatomic units of cognition and correlates with gene and protein units* The molecular mechanisms of antipsychotic drug action and the group of new antipsychotics* New treatments to offer, including medications, and psychological and psychosocial interventions, which are significantly better than previous treatment options

The new molecular age presents an exciting opportunity for schizophrenia research. This book is a helpful tool for clinicians in gaining a fuller understanding of schizophrenia. It previews future advances in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

 

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Contents

The Multidimensional Phenotype of Schizophrenia Peter F Liddle BMBCh PhD FRCR
1
Dimensional Models
2
Crows TwoSyndrome Model
3
The ThreeSyndrome Model
5
Functional Imaging Studies
10
Reversibility of Negative Symptoms
17
Mechanism of Acute Exacerbations of Schizophrenia
19
Schizophrenia and Affective Disorder
20
What Do We Try to Learn?
79
Fitting the Question to the Technology
82
Performance and Localization Issues
84
Review of the Research
86
Conclusion
102
Disruption of Information Flow Within Cortical Limbic Circuits and the Pathophysiology of Schizophrenia Patricia ODonnell MD PhD and Anthony ...
109
Pathophysiology of Schizophrenia
111
Role of Subcortical Circuits Controlling Prefrontal Cortical Activity
117

Genetic Factors Contributing to the Expression of the Syndromes
21
Conclusion
22
References
24
Implications of Early Sensory Processing and Subcortical Involvement for Cognitive Dysfunction in Schizophrenia John Gruzelier ALA PhD CPsych...
29
EEGRhythms and Consciousness
34
EventRelated Potentials
40
Sensory Gating
46
Visual Magnocellular and Parvocellular Dysfunction
55
Integration of Findings
60
Conclusion
67
References
69
Functional Neuroimaging in Schizophrenia Symptoms Treatment and Etiology Henry H Holcomb AID Deborah R Medoff PhD Adrienne C Lahti M...
77
Specificity of Neurobiological Substrates of Symptom Subsets in Schizophrenia
125
Repeated Antipsychotic Treatment and Depolarization Block of Dopamine Neurons
130
Conclusion
134
Molecular Biology and Antipsychotic Medications Bryan Roth MD PhD Peter F Buckley MD and S Charles Schulz MD
141
Molecular Mechanisms of Antipsychotic Drug Actions
145
Interactions of Typical and Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs With Multiple Neurotransmitter Receptors
155
Role of Cf os and Other Gene Products
160
Conclusion
161
Carol A Tamntinga MD
169
Index
171
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About the author (1999)

Carol A. Tamminga, M.D., is Chief of the Inpatient Program at the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland in Baltimore, Maryland.

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