The Fourth Protocol

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Bantam Books, 1985 - Fiction - 464 pages
5 Reviews
It is a time of political unrest in Great Britain. And behind the Iron Curtain an insidious plot is being hatched, a plan so incendiary that even the KGB is ignorant of its existence-- "Aurora," the sinister brainchild of two of the world's most dangerous men: the general secretary of the Soviet Union and master spy Kim Philby.

The wheels are in motion, the pawns are in place, and the countdown has begun toward an "accident" that could change the fact of British politics forever and trigger and collapse of the Western alliance.

Only British agent John Preston stand any chance of breaching the conspiracy. Through plot and counterplot, from bloody back streets to polished halls of power both East and West, his desperate investigation is relentlessly blocked by deceit, treachery, and the most deadly enemy of all...time.

"When it comes to espionage, international intrigue and suspense, Frederick Forsyth is a master."-- "The Washington Post"

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User Review  - christinejoseph - LibraryThing

agent John Preston tracks down Soviet attempt to set of Nuke in England - Good. It is a time of political unrest in Great Britain. And behind the Iron Curtain an insidious plot is being hatched, a ... Read full review

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User Review  - mahallett - LibraryThing

listened to a condensed version. not sure if this was better or worse. very surprising ending. who was the owner of the necklace talking to about the theft? the soviet agent? Read full review

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About the author (1985)

Frederick Forsyth was born in Ashford, England on August 25, 1938. At age seventeen, he decided he was ready to start experiencing life for himself, so he left school and traveled to Spain. While there he briefly attended the University of Granada before returning to England and joining the Royal Air Force. He served with the RAF from 1956 to 1958, earning his wings when he was just nineteen years old. He left the RAF to become a reporter for the Eastern Daily Press, Reuters News Agency, and the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). While with the BBC, he was sent to Nigeria to cover an uprising in the Biafra region. As he learned more about the conflict, he became sympathetic to the rebel cause. He was pulled from Nigeria and reassigned to London when he reported this viewpoint. Furious, he resigned and returned to Nigeria as a freelance reporter, eventually writing The Biafra Story and later, Emeka, a biography of the rebel leader Chukwuemeka Odumegwu-Ojukwu. Upon his return to England in 1970, Forsyth began writing fiction. His first novel, The Day of the Jackal, won an Edgar Allan Poe award from the Mystery Writers of America. His other works include The Odessa File, The Dogs of War, The Fourth Protocol, Devil's Alternative, The Negotiator, The Deceiver, The Fist of God, Icon, The Veteran, Avenger, The Afghan, and The Cobra.

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