The Handbook of Comparative Criminal Law

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Kevin Heller, Markus Dubber
Stanford University Press, Dec 1, 2010 - Law - 672 pages
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This handbook explores criminal law systems from around the world, with the express aim of stimulating comparison and discussion. General principles of criminal liability receive prominent coverage in each essay—including discussions of rationales for punishment, the role and design of criminal codes, the general structure of criminal liability, accounts of mens rea, and the rights that criminal law is designed to protect—before the authors turn to more specific offenses like homicide, theft, sexual offenses, victimless crimes, and terrorism.

This key reference covers all of the world's major legal systems—common, civil, Asian, and Islamic law traditions—with essays on sixteen countries on six different continents. The introduction places each country within traditional distinctions among legal systems and explores noteworthy similarities and differences among the countries covered, providing an ideal entry into the fascinating range of criminal law systems in use the world over.
 

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Contents

Comparative Criminal Law
1
Argentina
12
Australia
49
Canada
97
China
137
Egypt
179
France
209
Germany
252
Israel
352
Japan
393
Russia
414
South Africa
455
Spain
488
United Kingdom
531
United States
563
The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court
593

India
288
Iran
320

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About the author (2010)

Kevin Jon Heller is a Senior Lecturer at Melbourne Law School. His recent publications include "The Cognitive Psychology of Mens Rea," 99 Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology 317 (2009), and "Mistake of Legal Element, the Common Law, and Article 32 of the Rome Statute: A Critical Analysis," 6 Journal of International Criminal Justice 419 (2008). Markus D. Dubber is Professor of Law at the University of Toronto. His recent publications include The Police Power: Patriarchy and the Foundations of American Government (Columbia University Press, 2005) and The Sense of Justice: Empathy in Law and Punishment (New York University Press, 2006).

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