The History of India: The Hindú and Mahometan Periods

Front Cover
J. Murray, 1866 - India - 790 pages
1 Review

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.


Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 68 - The Village Communities are little Republics, having nearly everything they can want within themselves, and almost independent of any foreign relations. They seem to last where nothing else lasts. Dynasty after dynasty tumbles down; revolution succeeds to revolution; Hindoo, Patan, Mogul, Mahratta, Sikh, English, are all masters in turn; but the Village Communities remain the same.
Page 799 - More Worlds than One. The Creed of the Philosopher and the Hope of the Christian.
Page 69 - They seem to last where nothing else lasts. Dynasty after dynasty tumbles down; revolution succeeds revolution; but the village community remains the same. This union of the village communities, each one forming a separate little state in itself, has, I conceive contributed more than any other cause to the preservation of the...
Page 793 - STUDENT'S HISTORY OF ROME. From the EARLIEST TIMES to the ESTABLISHMENT OF THE EMPIRE, With Chapters on the History of Literature and Art. By Dean LIDDELL.
Page 819 - PENROSE'S (REV. JOHN) Faith and Practice; an Exposition of the Principles and Duties of Natural and Revealed Religion. Post Svo. 8s. 6d. - (FC) Principles of Athenian Architecture, and the Optical Refinements exhibited in the Construction of the Ancient Buildings at Athens, from a Survey. With 40 Plates. Folio.
Page 616 - Maratha thinks of nothing but the result, and cares little for the means, if he can attain his object. For this purpose he will strain his wits, renounce his pleasures, and hazard his person ; but he has not a conception of sacrificing his life, or even his interest, for a point of honour.
Page 793 - A Concise Bible Dictionary. For the use of Students and Families. Condensed from the above. With Maps and 300 Illustrations.
Page 161 - The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong indeed, that no philologer could examine them all...
Page 600 - Khafi Khan, the best historian of those times, gives his opinion that although Akbar was pre-eminent as a conqueror and a lawgiver, yet for the order and arrangement of his territory and finances and the good administration of every department of the state, no prince ever reigned in India that could be compared to Shah Jahan.
Page 647 - Though the son of a powerful chief, he had begun life as a during and artful captain of banditti, had ripened into a skilful general and an able statesman, and left a character which has never since been equalled or approached by any of his countrymen.

Bibliographic information