The Magic Mountains: Hill Stations and the British Raj

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University of California Press, Jan 1, 1996 - Travel - 264 pages
Kennedy charts the symbolic and sociopolitical functions of the hill stations during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, arguing that to the British in India these communities were much more than mere pleasure spots. Particularly after the revolt of 1857, they became political and military headquarters and cantonments for colonial troops. In addition, they were centers of local and regional development that provided employment for countless Indians, who often traveled great distances to work in the hill stations as servants, merchants, and clerks. These citadels also served year-round as places for British women to bear and raise children, promoting the biological and cultural reproduction of the colonial elite. Kennedy argues that the isolation of British authorities at the hill stations reflected the paradoxical character of the British raj, attempting to control its subjects while remaining separate and aloof from Indian society. Ironically, as more Indians were drawn to these mountain areas, first for work and later for pleasure, the carefully maintained boundaries between the British and their subjects eroded. Kennedy shows that the hill stations were increasingly incorporated within the landscape of Indian social and cultural life, especially after the turn of the century.
 

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Contents

THE HILL STATIONS OF BRITISH INDIA
1
CLIMATE AND THE COLONIAL CONDITION
19
LANDSCAPES OF MEMORY
39
NATURES CHILDREN
63
HOME IN THE HILLS
88
NURSERIES OF THE RULING RACE
117
THE PINNACLES OF POWER
147
THE INTRUSION OF THE OTHER
175
ARRIVALS AND DEPARTURES
202
CONCLUSION
223
Select Bibliography
231
Index
255
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Dane Kennedy is Professor of History at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln and author of Islands of White: Settler Society and Culture in Kenya and Southern Rhodesia, 1890-1939 (1987).

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