The Origins of the Cultural Revolution: Volume II, the Great Leap Forward 1958--1960

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Columbia University Press, 1983 - History - 470 pages
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The second volume in a trilogy which examines the politics, economics, culture and international relations of Chines from the mid-1950s to he mid-1960s, this volume tells the story of the Great Leap Forward -- Mao's utopian attempt to propel China economically and socially into the twenty-fist century by mobilizing his nation's greatest asset: its disciplined, manpower. The effort produced economic disaster and political dissension, and helped to precipitate the Sino-Soviet split. Today's leaders point to it as the beginning of two decades of national trauma, which ended only after the death of Mao and the purge of the Gang of Four. Those leaders have recently authorized the release of a mass of new documentation in the form of political reminiscences, economic statistics, and leaders' speeches. This volume is the first scholarly work to use the new material comprehensively, weaving it into the narrative along with the contemporary record and the revelations published in Red Guard newspapers during the cultural revolution. The result is the most detailed account and analysis to date of what went wrong and why.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Mao in Moscow
7
The Politburo Tours China
20
The Chengtu Conference
35
The Leap Is Launched
51
The Coming of the Communes
77
High Tide
91
Withdrawal at Wuhan
119
High Noon at Lushan
187
The SinoSoviet Split Emerges
255
The End of the Leap
293
Conclusions
326
Abbreviations used in notes
337
Notes
339
Bibliographical Note
434
Bibliography
436

Mao Veers Right
136
Chairman Liu
160
A Rectification of Names terminological turbulence in the communes
181

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About the author (1983)

Roderick MacFarquhar, a former British Member of Parliament, is Leroy B. Williams Professor of History and Political Science at Harvard, chairman of its Government Department, and a research associate of the Fairbank Center for East Asian Research.

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