The Rome Express

Front Cover
Wildside Press, 2006 - Fiction - 112 pages
"Again and again the porter knocked and called loudly. Still meeting with no response, he opened the door of the compartment and went in.

It was now broad daylight. No blind was down; indeed, the one narrow window was open, wide; and the whole of the interior of the compartment was plainly visible, all and everything in it.

The occupant lay on his bed motionless. Sound asleep? No, not merely asleep-the twisted unnatural lie of the limbs, the contorted legs, the one arm drooping listlessly but stiffly over the side of the berth, told of a deeper, more eternal sleep. The man was dead. Dead-and not from natural causes..."

Other editions - View all

About the author (2006)

Baroness Emmuska Orczy (1865-1947) was a British novelist, playwright and artist of Hungarian noble origin. She was most notable for her series of novels featuring the Scarlet Pimpernel.

Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936) better known as G. K. Chesterton, was an English writer, lay theologian, poet, philosopher, dramatist, journalist, orator, literary and art critic, biographer, and Christian apologist. Chesterton is often referred to as the "prince of paradox." Time magazine, in a review of a biography of Chesterton, observed of his writing style: "Whenever possible Chesterton made his points with popular sayings, proverbs, allegories-first carefully turning them inside out." Chesterton routinely referred to himself as an according to Time, said of him, "He was a man of colossal genius."

Ernest William Hornung (1866-1921) was an English author and poet known for writing the A. J. Raffles series of stories about a gentleman thief in late 19th-century London.

Arthur George Frederick Griffiths (1838 - 1908) was a prison administrator and author who published more than 60 books during his lifetime. He was also a military historian who wrote extensively about the wars of the 19th century, and was for a time military correspondent for The Times newspaper. His later accounts of crime and punishment in England were "sensational and grotesque," designed to appeal to the baser fascinations of his Victorian readers. Their success led him to write mystery crime novels such as Fast and Loose, published in 1885.

Bibliographic information