The Tombs of Atuan

Front Cover
Atheneum, 1971 - Children's stories - 163 pages
From Ursula K. Le Guin -- winner of numerous awards including the National Book Award, a Pushcart Prize, five Hugos, five Nebula Awards, the Kafka Award and others -- comes another exciting tale. They took away everything. Home, family possession. They gave her a name. Arha, the Eaten One. They dedicated her life as high priestess to the ancient and nameless Powers of the Earth. And set her down at the Place of the Tombs in the deserts of Atuan. Then, suddenly, a thief came to the dark, endless labyrinth of her kingdom, seeking the greatest treasure of the Tombs, the broken Ring of Erreth-Akbe. A young wizard, Ged...

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THE TOMBS OF ATUAN

User Review  - Kirkus

A finely realized fantasy set in the ancient Place of the Tombs, a desert society of women and eunuchs, where Tenar is taken at six and renamed Arha, the Eaten One, because her former existence must ... Read full review

Review: The Tombs of Atuan (Earthsea Cycle #2)

User Review  - Jacob - Goodreads

I want to give this five stars, but I'm afraid one of the next ones will be even better, and my attempts to rate it higher will cause Goodreads to implode. Or something. On second thought, no. Five ... Read full review

Contents

Prologue
3
The Wall Around the Place II
11
The Prisoners
27
Copyright

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About the author (1971)

Ursula K. Le Guin was born Ursula Kroeber in Berkeley, California on October 21, 1929. She received a bachelor's degree from Radcliffe College in 1951 and a master's degree in romance literature of the Middle Ages and Renaissance from Columbia University in 1952. She won a Fulbright fellowship in 1953 to study in Paris, where she met and married Charles Le Guin. Her first science-fiction novel, Rocannon's World, was published in 1966. Her other books included the Earthsea series, The Left Hand of Darkness, The Dispossessed: An Ambiguous Utopia, The Lathe of Heaven, Four Ways to Forgiveness, and The Telling. A Wizard of Earthsea received an American Library Association Notable Book citation, a Horn Book Honor List citation, and the Lewis Carroll Shelf Award in 1979. She received the Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters in 2014. She also received the Nebula Award and the Hugo Award. She also wrote books of poetry, short stories collections, collections of essays, children's books, a guide for writers, and volumes of translation including the Tao Te Ching of Lao Tzu and selected poems by Gabriela Mistral. She died on January 22, 2018 at the age of 88.

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