Train to Pakistan

Front Cover
Grove Press, 1990 - Fiction - 181 pages
10 Reviews
?In the summer of 1947, when the creation of the state of Pakistan was formally announced, ten million people?Muslims and Hindus and Sikhs?were in flight. By the time the monsoon broke, almost a million of them were dead, and all of northern India was in arms, in terror, or in hiding. The only remaining oases of peace were a scatter of little villages lost in the remote reaches of the frontier. One of these villages was Mano Majra.”

It is a place, Khushwant Singh goes on to tell us at the beginning of this classic novel, where Sikhs and Muslims have lived together in peace for hundreds of years. Then one day, at the end of the summer, the ?ghost train” arrives, a silent, incredible funeral train loaded with the bodies of thousands of refugees, bringing the village its first taste of the horrors of the civil war. Train to Pakistan is the story of this isolated village that is plunged into the abyss of religious hate. It is also the story of a Sikh boy and a Muslim girl whose love endured and transcends the ravages of war.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - arubabookwoman - LibraryThing

In 1947, with the end of the British Raj, the Indian sub-continent was split into two countries, Pakistan and India. By the summer of 1947, ten million people, Muslim, Hindu and Sikh, were in flight ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - whitewavedarling - LibraryThing

This is a quick read, and fairly interesting, with characters that are both believable and unique, worth reading about. However, for me at least, the ending came across as both rushed and somewhat ... Read full review

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About the author (1990)

Khushwant Slngh (1915-2014) authored over fifty books including A Train to Pakistan, a two-volume History and Religion of the Sikhs, which is still considered the most authoritative writing on the subject, innumerable collections of short stories and articles as well as translations of Urdu and Punjabi works. He was also the editor of The Illustrated Weekly of India, a Times of India publication. His acerbic pen, his wit and humour, and, most of all, his ability to laugh at himself made him immensely popular. Suddhasattwa Basu is a painter, illustrator and animator. Graduate of the Government College of Art and Craft, Calcutta, he has worked in the Design Unit of Thomson Press and has been closely associated with Target, the children's magazine. His love and keen observation of nature and landscape also find expression in To Live in Magic, a book of nature poems and prayers for children by Ruskin Bond. His cartoon character Ghayab will be seen shortly in a television serial on Doordarshan.

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