XX Stories

Front Cover
Leopold Wagner
T.F. Unwin, 1895 - Short stories, English - 273 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 26 - ... round, up a side lane, and along a narrow passage that ran between the churchyard and the back of the house. At that moment the church clock struck eight, and the bells chimed the Evening Hymn, slowly and musically, as they had done, perhaps, for centuries; slowly and musically, as they had done in the days gone by, while I sat at the window with little Margaret in my arms, nursing her to sleep. A flood of memories came across my heart. Forgetful of the object that had brought me there I leant...
Page 55 - Some accounts lay before me which I was anxious to cast, but several times I essayed, and seemed incapable of doing so. As the simple words of our daily language, which issue from our lips simultaneously with the thought, become vague and indistinct if we muse upon their origin, and repeat them several times to ourselves, so by dwelling long upon the idea of the work before me, it seemed to have become confused and difficult.
Page 27 - I leant against the railings and wept. The chimes ceased, and the spell was broken. I was recalled to the momentous task that lay before me. I approached, with a trembling step, the window of what used to be our sitting-room on the ground-floor. I saw lights through the crevices of the closed shutters. Putting my ear closely against the wall I heard the hum of voices. Faint, confused and indistinct as the sound was, something — perhaps the associations of the place — made me feel that I was listening...
Page 26 - ... determination would have sustained her under any feeling of disgrace. I walked slowly up the old familiar lane, until I stood before the gateway. It was near eight o'clock, and the gate was closed, but it looked the same as it did when I first knew it as a boy ; so did the quaint oak carving, and the silent court-yard, seen through the small grating. There were no lights in the front, and I went cautiously round, up a side lane, and along a narrow passage that ran between the churchyard and the...
Page 27 - ... but that I dreaded, although I longed, to hear what he might have to tell me. He came directly towards me, as if by instinct; for I was perfectly, breathlessly, still; and paused immediately opposite to where I was partially hidden, under the shadow of the wall. He seemed to feel that some one was there, and his glazed eyes were directed full upon me, looking now more ghastly than ever, as they glistened in the light of the moon, which just then had passed from behind a cloud. Unable to restrain...
Page 22 - I was taken into custody, with the bank notes in my pocket-book, by a Bow Street officer, acting under Mr. Picard senior's orders. My wife was not at home. Casting, therefore, one hurried glance at my poor, unconscious, sleeping child — a glance in which were concentrated the love and agony of a lifetime — I turned my back upon the old house to go with the officer to the appointed prison. The next morning, at the preliminary examination before a magistrate, the charge was made out. I gave my...
Page 18 - I attained the position of first-class clerk. My advance was not due to any remarkable ability that I had displayed ; nor because I had excited the interest of any member of the firm, for I seldom saw the faces of my employers.
Page 31 - They were engaged in evening prayer. My child — my dear lost child — now grown tall and graceful, was kneeling at a chair : her long golden hair falling in clusters over her slender, folded hands. Esther was also kneeling with her face towards me. It looked more aged and careworn than I expected to see it, but it was still the old pale, statue-like face that I had cherished in my dreams, and that had nestled on my shoulder in the days gone by. He who now stood in my place as the guardian of my...
Page 27 - ... of the place — made me feel that I was listening to my wife and child. I was startled by the sound of footsteps ; and, turning my eyes in the direction of the entrance to the passage (it had but one entrance) I saw approaching an old man, who had been in the service of the firm as house porter for fifty years. He was called blind Stephen ; for, though not totally blind, his eyes had a stony, glazed appearance. He had lived so long in the house that he would have died if he had been removed...

Bibliographic information