Science, Technology and Medicine in Colonial India

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 20, 2000 - History - 234 pages
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Interest in the science, technology and medicine of India under British rule has grown in recent years and has played an ever-increasing part in the reinterpretation of modern South Asian history. Spanning the period from the establishment of East India Company rule through to Independence, David Arnold's wide-ranging and analytical survey demonstrates the importance of examining the role of science, technology and medicine in conjunction with the development of the British engagement in India and in the formation of Indian responses to western intervention. One of the first works to analyse the colonial era as a whole from the perspective of science, the book investigates the relationship between Indian and western science, the nature of science, technology and medicine under the Company, the creation of state-scientific services, 'imperial science' and the rise of an Indian scientific community, the impact of scientific and medical research and the dilemmas of nationalist science.
 

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Contents

Introduction science colonialism and modernity
1
Science under the Company
19
Western medicine in an Indian environment
57
Technologies of the steam age
92
Imperial science and the Indian scientific community
129
Science state and nation
169
Conclusion
211
Biographical notes
214
Bibliographic essay
217
Index
227
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