The History of England: From the Invasion of Julius Csar to the Revolution in 1688, Volume 4

Front Cover
Little, Brown and Company, 1854 - Great Britain
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 520 - I am come amongst you, as you see, at this time, not for my recreation and disport, but being resolved, in the midst and heat of the battle, to live or die amongst you all, to lay down for my God, and for my kingdom, and for my people, my honour and my blood, even in the dust.
Page 182 - ... ever filled a throne: a conduct less rigorous, less imperious, more sincere, more indulgent to her people, would have been requisite to form a perfect character. By the force of her mind, she controlled all her more active and stronger qualities, and prevented them from running into excess.
Page 541 - ... of justice have unjustly refused or forborne to proceed against such offenders according to the same laws and statutes, upon pretence that the said offenders were punishable only by martial law and by authority of such commissions as aforesaid; which commissions and all other of like nature are wholly and directly contrary to the said laws and statutes of this your realm.
Page 541 - England, it is declared and enacted, That no freeman may be taken or Imprisoned, or be disseised of his freehold or liberties, or his free customs, or be outlawed or exiled, or in manner destroyed, but by the lawful judgment of his peers, or by the law of the land.
Page 525 - While she was yet near at hand, that I might hear of her once in two or three days, my sorrows were the less: but even now my heart is cast into the depth of all misery.
Page 521 - ... your valour in the field, we shall shortly have a famous victory over those enemies of my God, of my kingdom, and of my people.
Page 520 - I know I have the body but of a weak and feeble woman; but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too ; and think foul scorn that Parma or Spain, or any prince of Europe should dare to invade the borders of my realm...
Page 181 - There are few great personages in history who have been more exposed to the calumny of enemies, and the adulation of friends, than Queen Elizabeth ; and yet there is searcely any whose reputation has been more certainly determined by the unanimous consent of posterity. The unusual length of her administration, and the strong features of her character, were able to overcome all prejudices ; and obliging her detractors...
Page 245 - My lord, out of the love I bear to some of your friends, I have a care of your preservation. Therefore I would advise you, as you tender your life, to devise some excuse to shift off your attendance at this parliament. For God and man hath concurred to punish the wickedness of this time.
Page 541 - By pretext whereof some of Your Majesty's subjects have been by some of the said commissioners put to death, when and where, if, by the laws and statutes of the land, they had deserved death, by the same laws and statutes also they might, and by no other ought, to have been judged and executed.

Bibliographic information