The Western Literary Messenger, Volume 10

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Thomas & Lathrops, 1848
 

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Page 283 - Many books require no thought from those who read them, and for a very simple reason ; — they made no such demand upon those who wrote them. Those works therefore are the most valuable, that set our thinking faculties in the fullest operation. For as the solar light calls forth all the latent powers and dormant principles of vegetation contained in the kernel, but which, without...
Page 315 - State are unable to protect or from any cause fail in or refuse protection of the people in such rights, such facts shall be deemed a denial by such State of the equal protection of the laws to which they are entitled under the Constitution of the United States...
Page 357 - WE must consult the gentlest manner and softest seasons of address ; our advice must not fall like a violent storm, bearing down and making those to droop, whom it is meant to cherish and refresh. It must descend as the dew upon the tender herb, or like melting flakes of snow ; the softer it falls, the longer it dwells upon, and the deeper it sinks into the mind.
Page 171 - Vallee, and have seen with no less gratification than astonishment, nearly one hundred fellow-beings who, but a short time since, were shut out from all communion with mankind, who were objects of loathing and disgust, many of whom rejected every article of clothing, others of whom, unable to stand erect, crouched themselves in corners and gave signs of life only by piteous howls, others in whom the faculty of speech had never been developed, and many whose voracious and indiscriminate gluttony satisfied...
Page 294 - ... ordinary concerns, altogether unconnected with the funeral, such as the state of the markets, the promise of the season, or change of tenants ; but still with a sobriety of manner and voice, that was insensibly produced by the influence of the simple ceremony now closed, by the quiet graves around, and the shadow of the spire and grey walls of the house of God. Two men yet stood together at the head of the grave, with countenances of sincere but unimpassioned grief.
Page 295 - Some turned their heads away to hide the tears that needed not to be hidden, — and when the Brothers had released each other from a long and sobbing embrace, many went up to them, and, in a single word or two, expressed their joy at this perfect reconcilement. The Brothers themselves walked away from the churchyard, arm in arm with the Minister to the Manse.
Page 245 - EDUCATION does not commence with the alphabet'; it begins with a mother's look: with a father's nod of approbation, or...
Page 275 - Moorfields in musical thunder, or whisper its terrible secret in every private ear : and to this gainly aspect and tuneful voice he added a most expressive and eloquent action. Improved by conscientious practice, and instinct with his earnest nature, this elocution was the acted sermon, and by its pantomimic portrait enabled the eye to anticipate each rapid utterance, and helped the memory to treasure up the palpable ideas. None ever used so boldly, nor with more success, the highest styles of impersonation....
Page 294 - ... spade, so that the newest mound in the church-yard was scarcely distinguishable from those that were grown over by the undisturbed grass and daisies of a luxuriant spring. The burial was soon over; and the party, with one consenting motion, having uncovered their heads, in decent reverence of the place and occasion, were beginning to separate, and about to leave the churchyard. Here some...
Page 294 - Surely if any thing could have softened their hearts towards each other, it must have been to stand silently, side by side, while the earth, stones, and clods, were falling down upon their father's coffin. And doubtless their hearts were so softened. But pride, though it cannot prevent the holy affections of nature from being felt, may prevent them from being shown ; and these two brothers...

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