A dictionary, geographical, statistical, and historical, of the various countries, places, and principal natural objects in the world, Volume 4

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 233 - Where, as to shame the temples deck'd By skill of earthly architect, Nature herself, it seem'd, would raise A Minster to her Maker's praise ! Not for a meaner use ascend Her columns, or her arches bend ; Nor of a theme less solemn tells That mighty surge that ebbs and swells, And still, between each awful pause, From the high vault an answer draws, In varied tone prolong'd and high, That mocks the organ's melody.
Page 142 - According to the terms of the Constitution, the crown is hereditary in the male line ; but, at the extinction of the latter, also in the female line. The sovereign comes of age at the completed eighteenth year, and, during his minority, the nearest heir to the throne takes the regency. In the hands of the king is the sole executive power, which he exercises through responsible ministers. The legislature is jointly in the king and Parliament, the latter consisting of two chambers. The Upper Chamber...
Page 365 - Every house, great and small, is divided into two distinct parts, which only join together by a narrow passage. The first house has a large court before it, and open galleries all round it, which is to me a thing very agreeable. This gallery leads to all the chambers, which are commonly large, and with two rows of windows, the first being of painted glass : they seldom build above two stories, each of which has galleries.
Page 366 - But what pleases me best, is the fashion of having marble fountains in the lower part of the room, which throw up several spouts of water, giving at the same time an agreeable coolness, and a pleasant dashing sound, falling from one basin to another.
Page 366 - These seats are also so convenient and easy, that I believe I shall never endure chairs as long as I live. The rooms are low, which I think no fault, and the ceiling is always of wood, generally inlaid or painted with flowers. They open in many places with folding-doors, and serve for cabinets, I think, more conveniently than ours.
Page 110 - Of this sum, the serfs had to give immediately 20 per cent., while the remaining 80 per cent, were disbursed as an advance by the Government to the owners, to be repaid, at intervals extending over forty-nine years, by the freed peasants. According to an official...
Page 362 - of February 18, 1856. The principal provisions of this imperial order are as follows : — ' Full liberty of worship is guaranteed to every religious profession. No one can be forced to change his religion. No legal documents shall acknowledge any inferiority of one class of Turkish subjects to another, in consequence of difference in religion, race, or language. All foreigners may possess landed property, while obeying the laws, and paying the taxes.
Page 20 - Carta constitutional' granted by King Pedro IV., April 29, 1826, and altered by an additional act, dated July 5, 1852. The crown is hereditary in the female as well as male line ; but with preference of the male in case of equal birthright. The constitution recognises four powers in the State, the legislative, the executive, the judicial, and the 'moderating' authority, the last of which is vested in the Sovereign.
Page 112 - This last, however, may be taken as the maximum levy, and is rarely exceeded. The number of recruits to be furnished by the empire in general, and by each district in particular, is fixed according to the results of .the preceding census. The nobles nominate such of their...
Page 366 - In the midst of the garden is the chiosk, that is, a large room, commonly beautified with a fine fountain in the midst of it. It is raised nine or ten steps, and inclosed with gilded lattices, round which vines, jessamines, and honeysuckles, make a sort of green wall. Large trees are planted round this place, which is the scene of their greatest pleasures, and where the ladies spend most of their hours, employed by their music or embroidery.

Bibliographic information