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Quenstedt (F. A.), Handbuch der Mineralogie. 2nd ed. Tubingen,
1863.

Dufrenoy (A.), Traite de Mineralogie. 2me id. Paris, 1856-60.
Descloizeaux (A.), Manuel de Mineralogie. Paris, 1862.
Dana (J. D.), System of Mineralogy. 5th ed. London, 1868.
Kenngott (A.), Die Minerale der Schweiz. Leipzig, 1866.

(f) Cotta (B. von), Rocks classified and described, translated by H.

Lawrence. London, 1866.
Zirkel (F.), Lehrbuch der Petrographie. Bonn, 1866.
Senft (F.), Lehrbuch der Mineralien und Felsartenkunde. Jena,

1869.

(/) First volume of Dana's System of Mineralogy. 4th ed. London, '855

Blanford and Scheerer on the Blowpipe. London, 1855. Rammelsberg (C. F.), Lehrbuch der Krystallkunde. Leipzig, 1852.

Naumann (C. F.), Elemente der Mineralogie. 8th ed. Leipzig, 1871.

(g) Bischoff (Gustav), Lehrbuch der chemischen und physikalischen

Geologie. 2nd ed. Bonn, 1863, &c.

English translation by the Cavendish Society.

Blum (R.), Die Pseudomorphosen des Mineralreichs Stuttgart, 1843,

&c. &c.

Cotta (B. von), Gangstudien. Freiberg, 1847, &c. &c.

6. Honour School of Jurisprudence.

1. General Regulations.

1. The Examination in the School of Jurisprudence includes—

(1) General Jurisprudence;

(2) The History of English Law;

(3) Such departments of Roman Law, and (if the Board of the Faculty of Law shall think fit) such departments of English Law, as may be specified from time to time by the Board;

(4) International Law, or some department of it specified by the Board. This may be omitted by Candidates who do not aim at a place in the First or Second Class.

2. Subject to such regulations as the Board may make from time to time, select portions of Historical study, approved by the Board of the Faculty of Arts (Modern History), may be substituted by Candidates for portions of Legal study; provided that no Candidate shall be allowed to offer in the School of Jurisprudence any select portion, whether of Legal or Historical study, which he has already offered in the School of Modern History.

2. Regulations Of The Board Of The Faculty Of Law.

The subjects of examination in the Honour School of Jurisprudence will be the following: —

1. General Jurisprudence.

Candidates will be examined in the principles of Analytical Jurisprudence, in the theory of Legislation, and in the early history of Legal Institutions.

They are recommended to read the following books:—

Austin, Jurisprudence, Lectures I, V, VI, and the Essay on the
Uses of the Study of Jurisprudence.

T. E. Holland, Elements of Jurisprudence.

W. Markby, Elements of Law.

Bentham, Theory of Legislation, by Dumont.

Sir H. Maine, Ancient Law, and the Lectures on Sovereignty (XII and XIII) in his Early History of Institutions. Students may also refer to the following works:—

Hobbes, Leviathan, The Second Part, Of Commonwealth.

Bentham, Principles of Morals and Legislation.

Savigny, System des heutigen romischen Rechts.

Sir H. Maine's works, so far as not above specified.

Fustel de Coulanges, La Cite Antique.

F. Pollock, Essays in Jurisprudence and Ethics.

O. W. Holmes, Common Law.

2. Roman Law.

1. The Institutes of Gaius.

The Institutes of the Emperor Justinian.

2. Digest, IX. 2, ad Legem Aquiliam.

Students are recommended to study the Institutes of Gaius and Justinian in the editions of Poste and Moyle respectively; and also to use some text showing clearly the relation of the two works one to another, such as that of Gneist, Pellat, Polenaar, or Holland. Reference may also be made to— J. Muirhead's edition of Gaius.

Alphonse Rivier, Introduction Historique au droit Romain.

W. A. Hunter, Exposition of Roman Law in the order of a code.

Ortolan, Justinian.

Puchta, Institutionen.

Salkowski, Institutionen.

Dirksen, Manuale (as a Lexicon for the study of the texts). The title of the Digest may be omitted by Candidates who do not aim at a place in the First or Second Class.

3. English Law.

1. The Law of Contract.

The subject may be studied in—

Sir W. R. Anson, Principles of the English Law of Contract.

S. M. Leake, Elementary Digest of the Law of Contract.

F. Pollock, Principles of Contract in Law and Equity. Reference may also be made to—

C. C. Langdell, Cases on the Law of Contract.

2. The Law of Succession, Testamentary and Intestate, to—

(1) Real Property.

(2) Personal Property.

The subject may be studied in—
Stephen, Commentaries, Vol. I and II.
Williams, Treatise on the Law of Real Property.
Williams, Treatise on the Law of Personal Property.

3. The Law of Real Property, in so far as it is not included in the foregoing subjects.

The subject may be studied in—

Williams, Treatise on the Law of Real Property.

Stephen, Commentaries, Vol. I. Book II. Part I.

Blackstone, Commentaries, Book II. The principal Statutes referred to in Williams' Treatise should be studied, and reference may be made to—

K. E. Digby, History of the Law of Real Property.

L. A. Goodeve, The Modern Law of Real Property.

4. The Law of the Constitution.

Candidates will be expected to have mastered the leading principles of existing Constitutional Law, and in particular to show a knowledge of the following topics :—

The Legislative power of Parliament, the modes in which it is exercised, and its extent as to Territory and Persons;

The Prerogatives of the Crown, the Privileges of the Houses of Parliament;

The Constitutional position of—the Privy Council, the Ministers of the Crown, the Established Church, the Courts of Law, and the Armed Forces.

They are recommended to read—

Blackstone, Commentaries, Introduction and Vol. I.

Stephen, Commentaries, Vol. II. Book IV. Part I, and Part II.
Chapters 1 and 2.

Traill, Central Government.

Hearn, Government of England.

Bagehot, English Constitution. They may also refer to

Stephen, History of the Criminal Law.

Forsyth, Opinions on Constitutional Law.

R. Gneist, Englische Verwaltungsrecht.

4. History of English Law.

History of English Legal and Political Institutions. Candidates must possess such an acquaintance with the history of the Institutions referred to under the head of the Law of the Constitution as is necessary to explain their present character and working. They may refer to—

Dr. Stubbs, Select Charters, and Constitutional History (omitting

those chapters which relate especially to Political History).
Hallam, Constitutional History.
Sir T. E. May, Constitutional History.
R. Gneist, Englische Verfassungsgeschichte.

5. International Law.

The subject may be studied in—

W. E. Hall, International Law, or T. Woolsey, Introduction to
International Law.

Heffter, Europaisches Vblkerrecht.
Reference may also be made to—

Dana, Notes to Wheaton's Elements.

Sir R. Phillimore, International Law, Vols. I-III.

Sir T. Twiss, Law of Nations.

7. Honour School of Modern History.

1. General Regulations.

1. The Examination in the School of Modern History includes—

(1) The continuous History of England.

(2) General History during some period, selected by the Candidate from periods named from time to time by the Board of the Faculty.

(3) Those who aim at a place in the First or Second Glass are also required to offer a special portion of History or a special Historical subject, carefully studied with reference to original authorities, or a select portion of Law, approved by the Board of the Faculty of Law. (But no Candidate can offer any portion of either Legal or Historical study which he has already offered in the School of Jurisprudence.)

2. Every Candidate is required to have a knowledge of Political Economy, of Constitutional Law, and of Political and Descriptive Geography.

3. A subject or period of Literature may also be added as an optional subject.

4. Candidates proposing to offer any special portion of History, or any special Historical subject, or any subject or period of Literature not included in the list suggested by the Board of the Faculty, must submit it to the approval of the Board, six months before the Examination.

2. Regulations Of The Board Of The Faculty Of Arts (modern History). The subjects of Examination in this School are :—

I. The History of England:

A. Continuous Constitutional History.

B. Continuous Political History to 1837.

C. A selected period to be studied in detail.

II. A period of General History.

III. (In the case of those Candidates who aim at a place in the First or Second Class), a Special Subject carefully studied with reference to original authorities.

IV. Political Science and Political Economy.

Every Candidate is required by the Statute to have a knowledge of Political Economy, of Constitutional Law, and of Political and Descriptive Geography.

I. History Of England. .
A. Constitutional History.

The following books are recommended:—

May's Constitutional History.
Bagehot's English Constitution.

Stubbs' Select Charters.
Stubbs' Constitutional History.
Hallam's Constitutional History.

B. Continuous Political History to 1837. The following portions of books are suggested, with a view of indicating the amount of detailed knowledge which Candidates will be expected to exhibit:—

Freeman's Norman Conquest,

Chaps, i, ii, iii, xxiii.
Green's History of the English

People, Vol. I.
Stubbs' Constitutional History,

Chaps, x, xii, xiv, xvi, xviii.

C. One of the following periods, to be studied in detail:

Ranke's History of England, Books

i, ii, iii, xxii.
Macaulay's History of England,

Chaps, i, ii, iii.
Bright's History ofEngland, Vols.
II. and III.

1. 449-1087.

2. 802-1272.

3. 1215-1485.
i. 1399-1603.

5. 1603-1714.

6. 1714-1815.

7. 1760-1848.

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