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3. Subjects And Order Of The Examination.—The subjects of the Examination are, (i) Human Anatomy and Physiology, theoretical and practical, (2) the Elements of Comparative Anatomy and Physiology, (3) Physics, Botany, and Chemistry, so far as they subserve Medicine. But those candidates who have obtained Honours, or passed the Preliminary Honour Examination, in the School of Natural Science, are excused from the examination in Physics1 and ChemistryThe Examination continues four or five days; it is held in the University Museum, and is conducted partly in writing, partly practically, partly viva .voce. Those candidates who satisfy the Examiners receive a certificate to that effect2.

2. Second Examination.

1. Time.—This Examination also takes place annually in Trinity Term, on a day of which notice is given in the University Gazette.

2. Candidates.—Candidates must have complied with the following conditions:—

(1) They must have completed sixteen Terms since they passed the Second Public Examination in at least one School, and eight Terms since they passed the First Examination mentioned above.

(2) They must satisfy the Regius Professor of Medicine that they have attended some Hospital of good repute which must be approved by the majority of the Examiners.

(3) They must give in their names to the Regius Professor at least a fortnight before the week fixed for the Examination, and must pay a fee of £1 to the Curators of the University Chest.

3. Subjects And Order Of The Examination.—The subjects of the Examination are, (1) the Theory and Practice of Medicine, including the diseases of women and children, (2) Materia Medica, (3) the Principles of Surgery and Midwifery, (4) Medical Jurisprudence, (5) General Hygiene, (6) Two Medical Authors, either (a) two of the four ancient authors, Hippocrates, Aretaeus,

1 Candidates may be examined in Physics and Chemistry even before the lapse of eight Terms from passing the Second Public Examination for the degree of B.A.

2 It may be desirable to bear in mind that impending legislation on the subject of licences to practise may cause the University to alter its regulations in regard to both this and other examinations in Medicine.

Galen, and Celsus, or (j3) one of these and one modern author, approved by the Regius Professor. The Examination is held partly in the University Museum, partly in the Radcliffe Infirmary: it is conducted partly in writing and partly viva voce, with a considerable proportion of practical work in each subject, and lasts four or five days. Those candidates who satisfy the Examiners receive a certificate to that effect.

(The Examination-papers both of this and of the First Medical Examination are usually printed, and may be procured at the Clarendon Press Depository, 116 High Street, Oxford.)

II. Examination In Preventive Medicine And
Public Health.

1. Time.—The Examination is appointed to take place annually in Michaelmas Term.

2. Candidates.—Candidates must have taken the Degree of Bachelor of Medicine in the University, and they must before the Examination pay a fee of £5 to the University.

3. Subjects Of Examination.—The subjects of the Examination are as follows:—

I. Hygiene.

\ 1. Meteorology and Meteorological Instruments. v2. Examination of Air, Water, Soils, and Food.

3. Unhealthy Trades.

4. Causes of origin and spread of Contagious Diseases and Epidemics: general history of Epidemics: prevention of Contagious Diseases and Epidemics.

5. Geography of Disease in General, as bearing on Comparative National Health.

II. Sanitary Law.

A general knowledge of the recent Acts bearing upon the Public Health, and of the duties of the various Officers as laid down by the Local Government Board.

III. Sanitary Engineering and Apparatus.

1. Water Supply.

2. Sewers and Drains.

3. Ventilation.

4. Construction of Dwellings.

5. Construction of Hospitals.

6. Conservancy of Villages and Towns.

7. Construction of Plans, Sections, and Contour Lines.

P

IV. Vital Statistics.

Elements for determining present Death Rate in different communities.

1. Birth Rate.

2. Death Rate.

3. Disease Rate.

4. Duration and Expectancy of Life.

5. Nomenclature and Classification of Diseases.

The following works may be consulted in reference to the above subjects:—

Parkes' Hygiene.

Buchan's Introductory Text-Book of Meteorology, and Handy Book of Meteorology.

Angus Smith's Air and Rain.

Angus Smith's Disinfectants and Disinfection.

Smith, E., Manual for Medical Officers of Health and Handbook for Inspectors of Nuisances; Manual of Public Health for Ireland. Monro's Public Health Act for Scotland. Hart's Manual of Public Health.

Army and Navy Medical Reports; Annual Reports of Sanitary Commissioners of India and Abstracts thereof; Aitken's Practice of Medicine, Vol. II. Part IV. Medical Geography; Boudin's Traite de Geographie Medicale.

Hecker's Epidemics of the Middle Ages.
Glen's Law of Public Health.
Le Chaumont's Lectures on State Medicine.
Baldwin Latham's Sanitary Engineering.

Box, T., A Practical Treatise on Heat, for the use of Engineers, Architects, &c.

Humber's Water Supply of Cities and Towns.

Reports of the Commissioners appointed to inquire into the best means of preventing the Pollution of Rivers.

Reports of the Commissioners on Water Supply, 1867-69.

Reports of Registrar-General, of Medical Department of Privy Council, and of Local Government Board.

Quetelet's Physique sociale, ou essai sur le developpement des facultes de l'homme.

Various Monographs in Zeitschrift fur Biologic

4. Certificates.—Those Candidates who satisfy the Examiners receive, on payment of a fee of £10, a certificate of proficiency.

§ 4. Examinations in Music.

Examinations For The Degree Of Bachelor In Music.

1. First Examination.

1. Time.—The Examination takes place annually in Hilary Term, on a day of which notice is given in the University Gazette.

2. Candidates.—Candidates must have matriculated as members of the University: they must either have passed Responsions (p. 129), or the Previous Examination at Cambridge, or have obtained the certificate of the Oxford and Cambridge Schools' Examiners (p. 212), or have satisfied the Examiners of Senior Candidates at one of the Local Examinations (p. 216) in English, in Mathematics, in Latin, and in either Greek or a modern language, i. e. in French, German, or Italian: they must give in their names to the Clerk of the Schools some time before the day of the Examination, and in so doing must pay a fee of £2.

3. Subjects And Order Of The Examination.—The subjects of the Examination are Harmony and Counterpoint, in not more than four parts. It is conducted partly viva voce, partly in writing. Those candidates who satisfy the Examiners receive, on application to the Clerk of the Schools, a certificate to that effect.

2. Second Examination.

1. Time.—The Examination takes place annually in Michaelmas Term, on a day of which notice is given in the University Gazette.

2. Candidates.—(a) Candidates must have passed the First Examination, and must have composed a piece of Music in fivepart harmony, with an accompaniment for at least five stringed instruments. This piece of music must be forwarded to the Professor of Music at an appointed time, together with a written assurance that the whole is the candidate's own composition: no candidate can offer himself for the Examination until this composition has been approved by all the Examiners. If approved it is not to be performed, but a copy of it must be deposited in the Music School.

(0) They must give in their names to the Clerk of the Schools some time before the day of the Examination, in so doing must pay a fee of £2, and exhibit the certificate of having passed the First Examination.

3. Subjects And Order Of The Examination.—The subjects are, (1) Harmony; (2) Counterpoint, in not more than live parts; (3) Canon, Imitation, &c.; (4) Fugue; (5) Form in Composition; (6) Musical History; (7) A critical knowledge of the full-scores of certain works which are designated from time to time by the Professor of Music, and notified in the University Gazette. The text-books which are recommended for the Examination are Ouseley's Treatises on Harmony, Counterpoint, and Form in Music; Berlioz, or Kastner, on Instrumentation; and either Burney's or Hawkins' History of Music. The Examination is conducted partly viva voce, partly in writing. Those candidates who satisfy the Examiners receive, on application to the Clerk of the Schools, a certificate to that effect.

in. OP EXAMINATIONS HELD UNDER THE SANCTION OP THE UNIVERSITY.

1. Oxford and Cambridge Schools' Examinations.

I. Examinations Of Boys For Certificates.

Examinations are held from time to time under the authority of a Board entitled the Oxford and Cambridge Schools' Examination Board, the members of which are appointed in equal numbers by the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge respectively.

The Examinations for Higher Certificates are held at Oxford, at Cambridge, at several Public Schools, and at certain other centres in July at a date fixed by the Board. Any boy who is under education at a School at which the Examination is held, or who, being under education at another School, applies through his Master to the Board, is admitted as a candidate: in either case two months' notice has to be given and a fee of £2 paid.

Boys who have left school, or who have not been members of any school, are also admitted to the Examination under the authority of the University of Oxford.

The Subjects of the Examination are divided into four groups:—

Group I. (1) Latin, (2) Greek, (3) French, (4) German.
Group II. (1) Elementary, (2) Additional, Mathematics.
Group III. (1) Scripture Knowledge, (2) English, (3) His-
tory.

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