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Group IV. (1) Natural Philosophy, Mechanical Division, (2) Natural Philosophy, Chemical Division, (3) Botany,

(4) Physical Geography and Elementary Geology,

(5) Biology.

The Examination in Latin includes as obligatory subjects (a) Prose Composition, (/3) Translation into English from books not specially prepared, (y) Grammar. Candidates may also offer a portion of a classical author as a prepared book, which must be selected, with certain admissible exceptions, from a list issued from time to time by the Board. A paper in Verse Composition is also set, but deficiency in it, or the omission of it, may be compensated by the merit of the candidate's other work in this part of the Examination.

The Examination in Greek includes as obligatory subjects (a) Translation into English from books not specially prepared, (/3) Grammar, (y) either a portion of one classical author to be specially prepared, and to be selected, with certain admissible exceptions, from a list issued from time to time by the Board, or Prose Composition. A paper in Verse Composition is also set, but deficiency in it, or the omission of it, may be compensated by the merit of the candidate's other work in this part of the Examination.

The Examination in Elementary Mathematics includes as obligatory subjects, (1) Arithmetic, (2) those parts of Elementary Geometry which are treated of in Euclid I, II, (3) Elementary Algebra, to the extent required in Responsions (see p. 130).

(For the details of the other subjects the reader is referred to the Regulations of the Oxford and Cambridge Schools' Examination Board, published at the Clarendon Press.)

Every candidate who satisfies the Examiners in at least four subjects, taken from not less than three different groups (with the exception that candidates who satisfy the examiners in one subject taken from Group ii. or Group iv. may offer three subjects taken from Group i.) receives a certificate from the Board.

This certificate exempts an Undergraduate from the necessity of passing Responsions, provided that it states that the holder of it has passed in Latin, Greek, and Elementary Mathematics as specified above.

It is also accepted by most Colleges, by the Halls, and by the Delegates of Non-Collegiate Students, as a substitute for the ordinary Matriculation Examination: but in almost all cases the certificate must be of such a kind as to carry with it an exemption from Responsions as stated above; and in several Colleges it must also show that the candidate has passed with distinction in at least one subject. Enquiry should in each case be made of the College authorities as to the conditions under which the certificate is accepted.

II. Examinations Of Boys' Schools. The same Board also holds Examinations of Schools, and parts of Schools, on the application of the Head Master or Governing Body. The arrangements are made in each case to suit the convenience of the particular School which is to be examined: and full particulars respecting the general conditions of the Examinations will be found in the printed Regulations of the Board, mentioned above. The Examination of a School may be combined with the Examination of particular boys in a School for certificates.

III. Examination Of Girls For Certificates. The general conditions are the same as those for boys, with the exceptions (i) that the Italian language is added to Group I, Drawing to Group II, and Music to Group IV, and (z) that the Examination may be passed in two portions, not less than two subjects being offered each time. The certificate does not carry with it, as it does in the case of boys, any privileges at the University.

IV. Examination Of Girls' Schools.

The general conditions are the same as those which are mentioned above for Boys' Schools.

Further information than is contained in the Regulations already referred to can be obtained on application to the Secretary to the Delegacy, Hertford College.

2. Oxford Local Examinations.

Examinations of persons who are not members of the University are held once at least in every year at Oxford, and in such other places as the Delegates from time to time appoint, upon application from a Local Committee formed in any place for that purpose, under the authority of a Board entitled the Delegacy of Local Examinations.

I. Examination Of Junior Candidates.

Candidates for this Examination, who may be of either sex, must not have exceeded their sixteenth year on the ist of July in the year in which the Examinations are held. The Examination consists of two parts: I. Examination in preliminary subjects, i.e. (i) Reading aloud from an English author, (2) Writing from dictation, (3) English Grammar and Composition, (4) Arithmetic, as far as Single Rule of Three. This part of the Examination is obligatory on all candidates. II. Examination in the following subjects: 1. Religious Knowledge, i.e. in certain selected books of the Bible, and in parts of the Book of Common Prayer. All candidates must be examined in at least one division of this subject, unless their parents or guardians object to it. 2. English, i.e. Greek and Roman History, English History, a selected Play of Shakspeare and Geography. Candidates are required to pass in two of these divisions in order to pass in the Section. 3. Latin. 4. Greek. 5. French. 6. German. 7. Mathematics, including Euclid Books i. ii. and Algebra to Simple Equations. 8. Mechanics and Mechanism. 9. Chemistry. Every candidate is required to satisfy the Examiners in three at least of these subjects, and no candidate is examined in more than six. Candidates may also offer themselves for examination in Drawing and Music. Successful candidates receive certificates stating the subjects in which they have passed, and their names are published in three divisions according to their merits. Lists are also published of the Candidates who distinguish themselves in each of the subjects from 1 to 9 inclusive, provided that they also obtain Certificates.

II. Examination Of Senior Candidates.

Persons of either sex are admitted to this Examination without limit of age. The Examination consists of two parts: I. Examination in preliminary subjects, i.e. (1) English Grammar, Analysis and Composition, (2) Arithmetic. This part of the Examination is obligatory on all candidates. II. Examination in the following Sections, A. Religious Knowledge, i.e. in certain portions of the Bible and of the Book of Common Prayer. All candidates must be examined in at least one division of this subject unless their parents or guardians object to it. B. English, i.e. (1) Greek and Roman History, (2) English History and Literature, (3) A Play of Shakspeare and a prepared portion of some other English author, (4) Geography, (5) Political Economy. Candidates must satisfy the Examiners in two of these divisions in order to pass in the Section. C. Languages, i.e. Latin, Greek, French, German, and Italian. No candidate can pass in this Section without shewing a fair knowledge of one of these languages. D. Mathematics, i.e. Pure Mathematics to Algebraical Geometry inclusive, Mechanics, and Hydrostatics. No candidate can pass in this Section who does not shew a fair knowledge of Euclid Bks. i.-iv, and Algebra to the end of Quadratic Equations. E. Natural Science, i.e. one of the three following groups of subjects: (1) Physics; (2) Chemistry; (3) Botany, Zoology or Geology and Mineralogy. Candidates may also offer F. Drawing, and G. Music. The names of the successful candidates under 19 years of age are published in two separate lists: (1) a list arranged in two divisions for each of the sections A. B. C. D. E. F. G.; (2) a general list, arranged in three divisions. Successful candidates also receive a certificate, signed by the Vice-Chancellor, conferring on them the title of Associate in Arts, and specifying the subjects in which they satisfied the Examiners and the Division or Divisions in which their names are placed. The names of all successful Candidates over 19 years of age are published in a separate list, and pass certificates are issued to them signed by the Vice-Chancellor, specifying the subjects in which they satisfied the Examiners. Those Candidates (Boys) who shew sufficient merit in translations from Latin and Greek authors, in Grammar, in Latin Prose Composition, and in Mathematics, to be excused from Responsions, may receive certificates from the Delegates to that effect; and those candidates (Girls) who shew sufficient merit in two languages and in Mathematics to be excused from the First Examination for Women, may receive certificates from the Delegates to that effect.

III. Oxford University Examination For Women.

The Delegacy of Local Examinations is also charged with the duty of conducting these Examinations which are held once at least in every year for the purpose of testing the attainments of women. They consist of a First Examination and a Second Examination which cannot be passed by any Candidate in the same Calendar year, and no Candidate is admitted to the Second Examination unless she has passed the First, or some other Examination accepted by the Delegates as equivalent. I. The First Examination, the standard of which corresponds with that of Responsions. Every Candidate is required to satisfy the Delegates in (i) two of the following languages: (a) Latin, (b) Greek, (c) French or Italian, (d) German; (2) Arithmetic; (3) Euclid I. II. or Algebra to Simple Equations inclusive. Candidates are examined in such manner as to test especially their knowledge of the grammar of the languages selected. Passages are set from unprepared books for translation into English, and Candidates are required to translate a piece of English into Latin, French or Italian, and German, as the case may be. II. The Second Examination, which consists of two parts: (1) The Pass Examination, (2) The Examination for Honours. The standard of the Pass Examination corresponds with that of the Public Examinations of the University (Pass). It is divided into six sections, viz. A. Languages, i. e. the same languages as are required in the Preliminary Examination, more advanced knowledge being required. B. Ancient History, i. e. the general outlines of Greek History from B.C. 510 to the death of Alexander, and of Roman History from the beginning of the First Punic War to the death of Nero, together with a special period of which an accurate knowledge is required. C. Modern History, i. e. English History from the accession of Henry II to the Revolution of 1688, together with a special period of which an accurate knowledge is required. D. Mathematics, i.e. (1) Algebra including Quadratic Equations and the simplest elements of Ratio and Proportion, (2) Euclid, Books I—III, IV. 1-9, VI. 1-8, and the Definitions of Book V, (3) Plain Trigonometry, (4) The Elements of Mechanics. E. Physical Science, i. e. (1) as necessary subjects: (a) The Elements of Physics, i. e. Mechanics, with either Heat, Light

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