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and Sound, or Magnetism and Electricity, and (b) the elementary inorganic Chemistry; (2) as optional subjects: (a) Biology including Physiology and Morphology, (4) Geology. F. Logic and Political Economy, to the extent represented by the greater part of Whately's and Jevons's Logic, and Adam Smith, Books i. ii. In order to obtain the certificate of having passed this Examination, it is necessary to pass, at the same time, in Section A and in one at least of the other Sections. No Candidate can be examined in more than two Sections at any one Examination, but Candidates who have passed may offer any of the other Sections at a subsequent Examination. Candidates may obtain a Certificate of having passed or passed with distinction as the case may be.

The Examination for Honours is divided into eight Sections, viz. (1) Latin and Greek; (2) Mathematics; (3) Modern History; (4) Physical Science; (5) English; (6) German, French, Italian, and Spanish; (7) Ancient History; (8) Philosophy. Under the provisions of a recent University Statute the Delegates have made arrangements for using the Honour Examinations of the University for the examination of Candidates offering to be examined in Greek and Latin, in Mathematics, in Modern History, and in Natural Science. In these Sections Candidates are examined by the University Moderators or Public Examiners (as the case may be) in the same Papers and at the same time as Members of the University, and the standard for each class is the same as in the Class List of Members of the University. In each of these Sections Candidates may offer a portion of the subjects of Examinations, and if they shew sufficient merit will receive a certificate of having passed or passed with distinction as the case may be.' No Candidate will be examined in more than one of the eight Sections at the same Examination, and no Candidate who has obtained Honours in any part of a Section may again be examined in that part of it. Candidates who have shewn sufficient merit are arranged in classes in each Section according to their merit, the names in each Class being placed in alphabetical order. The standard in all the Sections is that of the University Honour Examinations, and the Class Lists are published in the University Gazette, and recorded permanently in the University Calendar and the Honours Register of the University.

Candidates who have passed the First Examination, or an Examination accepted as equivalent, are permitted to offer themselves for an Examination in Music. Under the provisions of a recent University Statute the Delegates have made arrangements for using the First Examination for the degree of Bachelor of Music, which is conducted partly in writing, partly viva voce, in harmony and counterpoint in not more than four parts.

There is also a separate and optional Examination in the Rudiments of Faith and Religion, which is divided into two parts: (i) Holy Scripture, with or without a knowledge of the Greek Text of the selected books of the New Testament; (2) the Book of Common Prayer. Candidates may offer either one or both of these parts.

IV. Examination Of Schools.

The same Delegacy is also empowered to examine Schools or parts of Schools. A school may be examined either in connexion with the Local Examinations or independently. In the latter case arrangements are made by the Delegacy to meet the special requirements of the Schools which apply to be examined, as to time and subjects of Examination.

When a School Examination is combined with the Local Examinations it may be conducted either wholly or in part upon the Local Examination Papers, and the answers to the Local Examination Papers may be used either for the purposes of the School Examination only or for both the School and Local Examinations. In the last case the School must be appointed a Special Local Centre, to which Candidates who are not members of the School may be admitted at the discretion of the School authorities, and the Candidates whose answers are used for the purposes of the Local Examinations are examined under the same conditions of superintendence as Local Examination Candidates at other centres. Combined School and Local Examinations are in all cases held at the time at which the Local Examinations are appointed to be held, and so far as relates to the Local Examination Papers in accordance with the Local Examinations Time-table.

Further information as to the several Examinations, i. e. the time, places, and special books, which vary from year to year, may be obtained, in the case of the Local Examinations, from the Local Secretaries at the Centres at which the Examinations are held, and in the case of all the Examinations from the Secretary to the Delegacy, Clarendon Building, Broad Street, Oxford.

TV. EXTRA-ACADEMICAL PRIVILEGES OP
STUDENTS AND GRADUATES.

The following are some of the privileges and exemptions of Graduates, and of those who have passed certain of the University Examinations, in regard to admission to the several professions: they are all shared in common with members of other Universities.

1. In Law.

(a) Calls to the Bar. Members of the University who have passed a Public Examination may enter their name at an Inn of Court without passing the preliminary examination: if they have either passed' a Public Examination,' or have resided two full years at the University, they are, at several Inns, exempted from the payment of the caution-money which is required from other Students: they are allowed to keep their Terms by dining in the Hall of their Inn during three days in each Term: and their three years of studentship may be contemporary with their Oxford course, so that they may qualify themselves for being called to the Bar three years after passing ' a Public Examination.' (This term is ambiguous, but it has recently been interpreted to mean Responsions.)

(A) Admission as Attorneys and Solicitors.

1. Any one who has been matriculated at the University, or who has passed the Local Examinations of the University, is exempted from passing the preliminary examination which would otherwise be required before he could be articled.

2. Any member of the University who has passed Moderations can be articled for four years instead of five—and any Bachelor of Arts for three years instead of five.

2. In Medicine.

(a) Registration. Any Doctor or Bachelor of Medicine is entitled, on payment of a fee of £2 in respect of qualifications obtained before January i, 1859, and of £5 in respect of qualifications obtained since that date, to be registered as a medical practitioner.

(A) Royal College of Physicians. Any one who has obtained the degree of Doctor or Bachelor of Medicine may be admitted to the Pass examination for membership of the College: and a Graduate in Arts is exempted from examination in Greek, Latin, French, or German.

(c) Royal College of Surgeons.

1. Any one who has passed Responsions is exempted from the preliminary examination for membership of the College.

2. Any one who has taken the Degree of Bachelor or Doctor of Medicine is exempted from the examination in Medicine and Midwifery for membership of the College.

3. A Graduate in Arts is exempted from the preliminary examination for the Fellowship of the College.

4. A Graduate in Arts is admissible to the second Professional Examination for the Fellowship of the College if he has been engaged for five (instead of six) years in the study of the Profession.

5. Any one who has taken the degree of Bachelor or Doctor of Medicine is exempted from examination in Medicine for the Fellowship of the College.

(d) Society of Apothecaries.

1. Any one who has passed Responsions is exempted from the Society's examination in Arts.

2. Any one who has passed the First Examination for the degree of Bachelor of Medicine is admitted to membership of the Society on passing a single examination in Materia Medica, Therapeutics, Practice of Medicine, Pathology, Midwifery, Forensic Medicine, and Toxicology.

3. Any one who has taken the degree of Bachelor or Doctor of Medicine is admitted to membership of the Society on passing an examination in Practice of Medicine, Pathology, and Midwifery.

3. In The Army.

By the War Office Regulations a certain number of vacancies for Sandhurst are allotted every six months to University students. Candidates must either have passed the First Public Examination, in which case their age must be between the limits of seventeen and twenty-one, or have taken a degree in Arts, in which case their age must be between the limits of seventeen and twenty-two. The application must be made in the month of May or October and not later than the 31st of May or 31st of October next following the date of the Candidate's obtaining his University qualification, and must be accompanied by certain certificates, the particulars of which will be found in the printed Regulations respecting Examinations for Admission to the Royal Military College and for First Appointments therefrom to the Army. All University Candidates must satisfy the Civil Service Commissioners of their proficiency in Geometrical Drawing. In case there should be more Candidates than vacancies, the required number will be selected by competition among the said Candidates at the ensuing July or December Examination. But those University Candidates who fail in their first Examination are allowed to have a second opportunity, provided that their age, when they avail themselves of such second opportunity, does not exceed twenty-two, if undergraduates, and twenty-three, if graduates.

4. In The Civil Service.

Candidates for Attacheships in the Diplomatic Service who have passed the First Public Examination are exempted from examination in Latin. Candidates who have taken a degree are exempted from examination in all subjects except Handwriting, Precis, and French

V. SELECTED CANDIDATES TOR THE CIVIL SERVICE OP INDIA.

The University of Oxford being one of the Universities approved by the Secretary of State for India at which Selected Candidates for the Civil Service of India may pass their two years of probation, arrangements have been made by the University for the instruction, and by most Colleges for the reception, of such Selected Candidates.

1 This clause is suspended in competitive examinations.

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