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Sonnets.

Written in a Volume of Shakspeare........................ 164

To Fancy ..... * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164

To an Enthusiast ............... * * * * to o so o so o go go to go to to e o e o g to . . . . . 165

“It is not death, that sometime in a sigh'?................. 165

“By every sweet tradition of true hearts *.................. 166

On receiving a Gift . . . . . . . ......................... • . . . . . . . 166

Silence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . g is a to e to • . . . . . . . . 167

“The curse of Adam, the old curse of all ”................. 167

“Love, dearest lady, such as I would speak?” .............. 168

The Lee Shore... . . . . . . . . . * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * g e o os e e o e o o . . . . . . . 168

The Death-Bed . . . . . . . . . . . . .............. to go to go to go o $ to * * * * * g e e o 'o o 169

Lines on seeing my Wife and two Children sleeping in the same

Chamber ........................ g e g o so e * & © & © to so to go on to so e o 'o e 170

To my Daughter, on her Birthday ............................ 171

To a Child embracing his Mother...... to go to o so t e to g to o os e E & & . . . . . . . 171

Stanzas . . . . . . . . . . . . . to o go & d e to to $ to go e o go to e o so to to go & © to E to $ to so o to do so, o is to . . . . 172

To a False Friend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 173

The Poet’s Portion....... to $ to e o e g o e o se o 'o go to & E → * g g o is o do e o & • . . . . . . . 174

Time, Hope, and Memory. . . . . . . . . . . . . to go to go go e g o on to e o to o to on to 6 . . . . . 175

Song . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . e e g g g g o e o 'o o os e e s a 6 e s to g s 175

Flowers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . & o so go e o o to E & & C & © & * @ s a e o a o a s a * & so to e s to e o 'o o & ot 176

To * * * * * * * * * * • . . . . . . . . . . . & g g g to to so e o do so to e o so do o e o & to to . . . . . . . 177

TO • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178

TO & e g o o os e o e o so e o s e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179

Serenade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179

Ballad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180

Sonnets.

To the Ocean. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180

Lear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I8L

Sonnet to a Sonnet......... © to e o e a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181

False Poets and True . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182

TO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . to & © & © to e o o 182

For the Fourteenth of February ...... e & g is to go go o o so to o e o os e e g o e. e.. 183

To a Sleeping Child . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . to to o & to to to $ to o & C to o 'o e . . . . 183

HUM O R O U S P O EMS.

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My DEAR FRIEND: I thank my literary fortune that I am not reduced, like many better wits, to barter dedications, for the hope oy promise of patronage, with Some nominally great man ; but th;to where true affection points, and honest respect, I am free to gratify Imy head and heart by a sincere inscription. An intimacy and dearness, worthy of a much earlier date than our acquaintance can refer to, direct me at once to your name; and with this acknowledgment of your ever kind feeling towards me, I desire to record a respect and admiration for you as a writer, which no one acquainted with our literature, save ièlia himself, will think disproportionate or misplace&. If I had not these better reasons to govern me, I should be guided to the same selection by your intense yet critical relish for the works of our great Dramatist, and for that favorite play in particular which has furnished the subject of my verses.

It is my design, in the following Poem, to celebrate by an allegory that immortality which Shakspeare has conferred on the Fairy mythology by his Midsummer Night’s Dream. But for him, those pretty children of our childhood would leave barely their names to our maturer years; they belong, as the mites upon the plum, to the bloom’. of fancy, a thing generally too frail and beautiful to withstand the rude handling of Time: but the Poet has made this most perishable part of the mind’s creation equal to the most enduring; he has SC. intertwined the Elfins with human sympathies, and linked them by so many delightful associations with the productions of nature, that they are as real to the mind's eye as their green magical circle3 to #he outer sense.

It would have been a pity for such a race to go extinct, even though they were but as the butterflies that hover about the leaves and blossoms of the visible world.

I am, my dear friend,
Yours, most truly,
T. HoOI),

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