English Poems, Volume 2

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Clarendon Press, 1872
 

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Page 190 - And eloquence, native to famous wits Or hospitable, in her sweet recess, City or suburban, studious walks and shades. See there the olive grove of Academe, Plato's retirement, where the Attic bird Trills her thick-warbled notes the summer long ; There flowery hill Hymettus, with the sound Of bees...
Page 254 - Nothing is here for tears, nothing to wail Or knock the breast ; no weakness, no contempt, Dispraise, or blame ; nothing but well and fair, And what may quiet us in a death so noble.
Page 209 - To daily fraud, contempt, abuse and wrong, Within doors, or without, still as a fool, In power of others, never in my own ; Scarce half I seem to live, dead more than half. O dark, dark, dark, amid the blaze of noon, Irrecoverably dark, total eclipse Without all hope of day! O first created beam, and thou great Word, Let there be light, and light was over all; Why am I thus bereaved thy prime decree?
Page 333 - I was confirmed in this opinion, that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem ; that is, a composition and pattern of the best and honour-ablest things; not presuming to sing high praises of heroic men, or famous cities, unless he have in himself the experience and the practice of all that which is praiseworthy.
Page 210 - And buried ; but, O yet more miserable ! Myself my sepulchre, a moving grave ; Buried, yet not exempt, By privilege of death and burial, From worst of other evils, pains, and wrongs ; But made hereby obnoxious more To all the miseries of life, Life in captivity Among inhuman foes.
Page 143 - For God is also in sleep ; and dreams advise, Which he hath sent propitious, some great good Presaging, since, with sorrow and heart's distress Wearied, I fell asleep : but now lead on — In me is no delay : with thee to go, Is to stay here ; without thee here to stay, Is to go hence unwilling ; thou to me Art all things under heaven, all places thou, Who for my wilful crime art banish'd hence.
Page 16 - But grateful to acknowledge whence his good Descends, thither with heart, and voice, and eyes Directed in devotion, to adore And worship God supreme, who made him chief •Of all his works : therefore the omnipotent Eternal Father, for where is not he Present?
Page 65 - EUROPEAN HISTORY. Narrated in a Series of Historical Selections from the Best Authorities. Edited and arranged by EM SEWELL and CM YONGE. First Series, 1003—1154.
Page 35 - Yet when I approach Her loveliness, so absolute she seems And in herself complete, so well to know Her own, that what she wills to do or say, Seems wisest, virtuousest, discreetest, best.
Page 4 - Urania, and fit audience find, though few. But drive far off the barbarous dissonance Of Bacchus and his revellers, the race Of that wild rout that tore the Thracian bard In Rhodope, where woods and rocks had ears To rapture, till the savage clamour drowned Both harp and voice ; nor could the Muse defend Her son.

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