The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: Together with His Life, and Notes on His Lives of the Poets, by Sir John Hawkins, Knt. In Eleven Volumes ...

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J. Buckland, J. Rivington and Sons, T. Payne and Sons, L. Davis, B. White and Son [and 36 others in London], 1787

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Page 349 - Certainly, it is heaven upon earth, to have a man's mind move in charity, rest in providence, and turn upon the poles of truth.
Page 265 - Almighty GOD, the giver of all good things, without whose help all labour is ineffectual, and without whose grace all wisdom is folly : grant, I beseech Thee, that in this undertaking thy Holy Spirit may not be withheld from me, but that I may promote thy glory, and the salvation of myself and others : grant this, O Lord, for the sake of thy son, JESUS CHRIST. Amen.
Page 519 - From zeal or malice now no more we dread, For English vengeance wars not with the dead, A generous foe regards with pitying eye The man whom fate has laid where all must lie. To wit, reviving from its author's dust, Be kind, ye judges, or at least be just : Let no renewed hostilities invade Th' oblivious grave's inviolable shade.
Page 127 - I have been accused of acting a theatrical part. A theatrical part may either imply some peculiarities of gesture, or a dissimulation of my real sentiments, and an adoption of the opinions and language of another man. In the first sense, sir, the charge is too trifling to be confuted, and deserves only to be mentioned that it may be despised.
Page 344 - Have put their whole drama and epick to flight ; In satires, epistles, and odes, would they cope, Their numbers retreat before Dryden and Pope ; And Johnson, well arm'd like a hero of yore, Has beat forty French *, and will beat forty more...
Page 155 - ... the want of prudence, and that negligence and irregularity, long continued, will make knowledge useless, wit ridiculous, and genius contemptible.
Page 190 - I am almost in a fever whenever I am in his company. His figure (without being deformed) seems made to disgrace or ridicule the common structure of the human body.
Page 555 - The busy day, the peaceful night, Unfelt, uncounted, glided by; His frame was firm — his powers were bright, Though now his eightieth year was nigh. Then with no fiery throbbing pain, No cold gradations of decay, Death broke at once the vital chain, And freed his soul the nearest way.
Page 62 - ... but, unfortunately, he is not capable of receiving their bounty, which would make him happy for life...
Page 584 - Support me by the grace of thy Holy Spirit in the days of weakness, and at the hour of death, and receive me, at my death, to everlasting happiness, for the sake of Jesus Christ. — Amen.

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