The history, and proceedings, of the Derbyshire loyal true blue club, by the editor of the 'Derbyshire courier'

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Page 101 - House that we did feel it an incumbent duty upon us to propose a measure on the part of Government which, under the circumstances of the union so happily effected between the two countries, we thought of great public importance and necessary to complete the benefits likely to result from that measure : we felt this opinion so strongly that, when we met with circumstances which rendered it impossible for us to propose it as a measure of Government, we equally felt it inconsistent with our duty and...
Page 50 - To the King's Most Excellent Majesty Most Gracious Sovereign, We, Your Majesty's most dutiful and loyal subjects, the...
Page 36 - Another event, indeed, has intervened, in itself of a most painful nature, but powerful in aiding and confirming the impressions which the assembling and the proceedings of Parliament were calculated to produce. I mean the loss which the nation has sustained by the death of a Sovereign, with whose person all that is venerable in monarchy has been identified in the eyes of successive generations of his subjects ; a Sovereign whose goodness, whose years, whose sorrows and sufferings, must have softened...
Page 36 - Europe with astonishment beheld him filling the first place in the councils of his country, and managing the vast mass of its concerns with all the vigour and steadiness of the most matured wisdom. Dignity— strength — discretion — these were among the masterly qualities of his mind at its first dawn. He had been nurtured a statesman, and his knowledge was of that kind which always lay ready for practical application.
Page 101 - I think that the introduction of a certain proportion of catholics into the imperial parliament would be likely to be productive of any influence or effect detrimental or injurious to the welfare of the state, or the safety and security of the constitution.
Page 36 - Monarchy has been identified in the eyes of successive generations of his subjects ; a Sovereign, whose goodness, whose years, whose sorrows and sufferings, must have softened the hearts of the most ferocious enemies of kingly power ; — whose active virtues, and the memory of whose virtues, when it pleased Divine Providence that they should be active no more, have been the guide and guardian of his people through many a weary and many a stormy pilgrimage...
Page 101 - Government, we equally felt it inconsistent with our duty and our honour any longer to remain a part of that Government. What may be the opinion of others I know not, but I beg to have it understood to be a measure which, if I had remained in Government, I must have proposed.
Page 6 - AMONG the liberal donations of our countrymen to the fund for the relief of the widows and orphans of the brave men who fell in the...
Page 101 - Son, vol. vp 262. and unfettered. I certainly was of opinion that under a united Parliament those privileges might be granted under proper guards and conditions, so as not to produce any danger to the Established Church or the Protestant Constitution...
Page 37 - Unallured by dissipation, and unswayed by pleasure, he never sacrificed the national treasure to the one, or the national interest to- the other. To his unswerving integrity the most authentic of all testimony is to be found in that unbounded public confidence which followed him throughout the whole of his political career. Absorbed as he was in the pursuits of public life, he did not...

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