Page images
PDF
[graphic][subsumed]
[graphic]

ological Register, kept at t Assay Oflice, Calcuttmfor the 1/Uonth of June, 1835.

[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]

fnstmments the same, and situated as usual. It should be noted, that the Thermometer by which the temperature is registered this year, has been that attached to the

Barometer, that the aqueous tensions might agree with it ; this instrument hanging against a wall in the laboratory diifers a degree or two (heing higher in the morning __ .. § .

[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[graphic][graphic][ocr errors][graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors][graphic][ocr errors][graphic]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][ocr errors][graphic]

I.—-Notice of the Temple called Seo B_1/jnauth, (Siva Vaidyandth) discovered* by Sergeant E. DEAN, on the 3rd December, 1834, on the Hill of Uncluipahar, in the Shektiwati Territory.

[Read before the Asiatic Society, 5th August, 1835.]

[Some days prior to the arrival of Mr. DEAN'S facsimile of the inscription referred to in the following paper, another facsimile of the same inscription, taken by Dr. G. C. RANKIN, was presented to the Society, (see Proceedings of the 11th March, 1835.) This unfortunately was so much smeared, and injured by rain, on the way down, as to be totally illegible. Mr. DEAN has the credit, therefore, of putting us in possession of the best, though not the first copy of this ancient and valuable record. It is to his friend Sergeant Bnrrnass also, that we are indebted for the sketches of the architecture of the ruined temple. Lieut. Krrron, who has kindly undertaken for us the task of lithographing the columns, has also added a note on the date of this peculiar style of Hindu architecture; having himself bestowed much study on the Hindu remains in the Western Provinces.—En.]

Plate XXVII.—Unch§.pahar’r (the high hill) rears its blufi' head about five miles S. E. of Sikar, and by its superior height alone, would be a conspicuous object, within 15 or 20 miles : as when seen from a greater distance, the outline would become blended with the general masses of hills intervening and flanking it ; but it forms a decided and prominent landmark for a much larger circle, owing to its exact position being indicated by a tall spire, which can be distinguished above the tops of all the surrounding hills at such a distance, as to appear not higher than the human figure, although about 80 feet high ; and even when viewing it at the distance of two coss from the bottom of the hill, I still thought it might possibly be formed of one block of stone, (as I had been informed it really was, by a Dourah, from the hill fort of Rowasah, who had been residing all his life within five or six miles of it,) which would entitle it to be classed among the Laths. Fully expecting to find it so, I ascended the hill by the only regular path, or rather causeway, which begins at the south side of the village of Horse, and is paved with stones laid flat and on edge. It is 12 feet wide, and takes a general zigzag direction to the southward. The turns of each zigzag are particularly distressing in getting up, as there are no landings, but one slope is led into another. The whole length of the ascent is computed by the inhabitants of the neighbouring villages to be one wurrum coss. I imagine it cannot be less than one and half mile, with an average slope of two feet in 10.

’* I say discovered, as the resident braihman informed me, they had never seen

an European on the hill before, and one of them, an old man, had been reared here.

1' Dr. RANKIN designates the hill Harsh, from the name of a village on the spot.--En.

ZZ

On the way up by the side of the causeway, where the ground will admit, several small chabutras are raised, two or three feet high, on each of which is set a block of stone on end, blackened with smoke and oil : and about a quarter distance from the top, a singular building of cubical form appears, (Plate xxviii. fig. 1,) standing on a natural platform ; thelength of whose side is about 10 feet. It is dedicated by the present generation to DEVI. Its singularity consists in the peculiarly massive structure of a building of such a size. Set in the wall, opposite the door-way, are three orfour stones, on whichare carved in bass relief, various symbols, among which are three figures of an animal resembling the Nyl Gao*, more than the domestic cow, having no hump, a short tail, and a neck very like the former animal. I have given a sketch of some of the principal symbols, (figs. 2, 3, and 4,) as they may throw a light to assist in tracing the origin of the temple above, with which I think it is more than likely they are cotemporary.

About 100 yards from the upper end of the causeway, on passing the crest of the hill, stands a Binising Mandir, dedicated at present to Gamssn. It i built of about 45 cubical blocks of stone, without mortar or any connecting body; the side of each cube is about one foot. It forms an enclosure to the N. S. and W. but open to the E., and has no roof. The stones are extremely well hewn, and without the slightest ornament. Some mutilated figures are lying on the ground at the inside of the west face, (fig. 5.)

* The Nyl Gao is an object of peculiar sanctity in this country; the penalty of the crime of killing one is loss of nose, ears and estate, and expulsion from the village to which the perpetrator may belong.

« PreviousContinue »