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The mean temperature (day and night) from these four year’S observations is 76°; but as Nasirabad is elevated above the level of the sea nearly 1500 feet, the air is or ought to be cooler on that account by about 5°'5, so that the tem

perature at the sea level would be 8l'5, which is that assigned to the equator by, Humsouar.

If we calculate the mean temperature for the latitude (26° 18') by the formulae

which have been found in most cases to agree well with observation, we shall have,

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ByM4vnR’s,.. T (= 84°—-52° sin’ L) .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. = 738
B1uswsr1m's,.. .. T (= 8l°'5 cos. L) .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. = 731

D.uJnu1ssoN’s,.. T (= 27*‘1 cos.2 L in centesimal degrees*) .. .. = 7l'0
A'l‘KlNSON’S,.. . . . T (= 97°'08 cos‘; L—l0°'53) .. .. .. .. = 71.9

Mean = 72.5 which is 9° less than the observations give when reduced to the sea level. But it must be observed with regard to the locality of Nasirabad that it stands on an arid rock on which scarcely any vegetation exists unless during the rainy season: this will no doubt account for a part of the difierence. Mr. Arxmsoiw in his elaborate paper on Astronomical and other Refractions, (vide Memoirs of the Royal Astronomical Society, 2nd volume,) considers that 4" may be deducted from the observed temperatures of “large extended plainsz” allowing this, we have still 5° unaccounted for. However, on calculating by the same formula, the mean temperatures of several places in this country where observations have been made and recorded in this Journal, I find similar differences, part of which may very probably be owing to errors in the instruments used, as it is well known how great a dificrence exists in the thermometers manufactured for exportation to this country, no two of which are hardly ever found to agree in their indications, some differing several degrees from others. In the subjoined table, the latitudes and elevations of some of the places are given by rough estimation, not having at hand the means of ascertaining them accurately, but any probable errors in these estimations cannot affect the results materially. The difference of

temperature due to elevation has been calculated by Mr. A'rxINsoN’s Formula, viz. '

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Required difi. in degrees = , h being the elevation in feet.

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Comparison of Observed Mean Temperatures with those deduced from the Formula of MAYER, Brmwsnm, DAUBUISSON, and Arxmson.

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VI.—L0ngitude of Nas2'rab1id by Lunar Transits and by Observations of Moon Culminating Stars.—By Lieut.-Col. THOMAS Omvnn.

By Lun ar Transits.

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Months. Longitude. Sums of Se- Mean5_
conds.

H. M. S H. M. S. February 16th, 1831,. . .. .. 4 58 44 44 4 58 44 Ditto22nd,.............. . 59 10 114 .. .. 57 March2lst, ............ .. '58 57 171 .. .. 57 Ditto22nd, .. 59 12 243 .. .. 61 September 14th,. . . . .. . . .. . . 58 52 295 59 Ditto l5th,........... -- . 58 47 342 57 November 12th,.. .. -. . . .. 59 21 423 . (,0 Ditt013th,.............. - 59 05 488 . .. 61 February sm, 1332, .. .. .. . 58 41 529 .. . 59 Ditto 10th,.............. - 59 07 596 .. . 60 March9th,...........-.. 59 12 668 .. .. 61 Dittol0th,.............. 59 00 728 .. .. 61 Dittol2th,.............. -- 59 00 788 .. .. 61 April8th, -- 59 07 855 .'. .. 61 May7th,................ -- 59 29 944 .. 63 Ditt09th, .............. -- 58 50 994 .. . 62 June 6th, . . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. -- 58 59 1053 . . 62 Ditto 7th, .............. -- 58 49 1102 .. .. 61 October 1st, -- 58 50 1152 .. .. 61 November 1st, .. .. . . .. .. -- 59 09 1221 ,, ., 61 Ditt029th,.............. -~ 58 52 1273 .. .. 61 March 1st, 1833, .. .. .. .. '~ 59 09 1342 .. -- 6] Ditto 28th, . . . . . . . . .. . . .. - - 59 05 1407 . . . . 61 Ditt030th,.............. ' 59 05 1472 .. .. 611 Di¢t031st,...-.-........ " 59 04 1536 .. .. 61 Ap'ril28th,.............. " 58 57 1593 .. .. 61 Ditto29th,.............. -' 59 16 1669 .. .. 62 Ditt030tl1,....-......... " 59 18 1747 .. .. 62 Nvember l7th,.. " 59 00 1807 .. .. 62 Ditto 191211,.-.._.......... " 58 42 1849 .. .. 62 Longitude by Lums\rTr:msitsl .. .. I: 4 59 02

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Sums of seconds mulIntervals in tiplied by Date. Stars. Side1'ealTime. Longitude. the No. of Means. stars observed. I834. M. S. H. M. S. H.M. S. 56 4 58 56 160 53

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The exact agreement of the two is of course a mere chance : I think it right however to mention that I have inserted the whole of my observations, and not a selection from them.

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Wednesday Evening, the 14th January 1835.

The Reverend W. H. MILL, D. D. Vice-President, in the Chair.

After reading the Proceedings of the last Meeting, the Meeting passed to the Ballot for the Ofiice-bearers of the ensuing year, when the Lord Bishop, the Rev. Dr. MILL, Sir J. P. GRANT, and Mr. W. H. MACNAGHTEN were elected Vice-Presidents; and the Members composing the Committee of Papers last year were ilnanimously re-elected.

The Honorable Mr. J. B. Maononav, the Honorable Colonel W. Mon

msozv, and Mr. WILLIAM CARR; proposed at the last Meeting, were duly elected Members of the Society.

The Secretary read an Annual Report on the state of the Society.

For the whole of the past year, the Society had been deprived of the presence of its President, who had been driven to the Cape through ill health. The seats of two Vice-Presidents had also become vacant, one by Sir J. FnANK's departure to Europe, the other, by Sir C. T. Ma'rc.u.FE’s appointment to the Government of Agra. The Obituary List of the past year contained only the venerable name of Dr. CAREY, upon whose death, in June last, a tribute of regret and esteem had been recorded on the Society’s proceedings. The fate of another cherished Member, Mr. J. CALDER, remained an object of great anxiety, nothing having been heard of him since he sailed from India for the New Colony at St. George's Sound in October, 1833. The only faint hope of his safety rested in the report of some natives at Swan River, that a wreck had occurred to the northward; and it was satisfactory at least to know, that a vessel had been immediately despatched to ascertain the fact. The result has not yet transpired. ‘

Of Members who had tendered their resignation for various causes, the following names were mentioned: Messrs. G. MONEY, M. T. Cnnmrsnaw, M. LannLETTA, M. MANUK, and Raja KALIKRISHNA.

The new Members elected, including those of the present Meeting, amounted in number to fifteen, viz. Messrs. W. MARTIN, R. SPIERS, A. BEATTIE, J. S. Srorronn, W. Macxnnzns, F. RENAULD, Dr. A. HAMILTON, Lieut. W. Fonnv, Lieut. McLnon, Lieut.-Col. Low, Sir J. P. GRANT, Mr. W. GRANT, Honorable T. B. MACAULAY, Honorable Colonel MORRISON, and Mr. W. Cum.

The following distinguished individuals had been associated as Honorary Members: The Mnxnnna Mam; of Ava, Mr. Csoma on K6a6s, Professors Hnnamv, Knarnorn, Roses, and BUCKLAND, Sir Jomv HERSCHEL, and Col. Svxns.

The Expences of the year had been very moderate, leaving a considerable balance in the Treasurers’ hands.

PAYMENTS. RECEIPTS.

To paid for Copies of .the By balance of last year. . . 20 8 5 Journal Asiatic Society, By Subscriptions collected, 5472 6 0 furnished to Members in By Interest on Company's 1833,................ 928 00 Paper, 17,500, at5 per

To Establishment and con- cent. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . 1417 1 ll

tingent expences from 1st

Nov. 1833 to 31st Oct.

l834,.......... .. 2880 6 0 To balance of cash in hand, 3101 10 4

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Sa. Rs. 6910 0 4 $a. Rs. 6910 0 4

Outstanding Quarterly Bills due, but not yet collected, Rs. 2817.

The Publications of the past year had been limited to the Index of the 18 volumes of Quarto Researches, now nearly completed, and the Monthly Journal. The printing of M. Csoma on K6m"1s’s Tibetan Grammar was terminated, which would allow a new volume of Researches immediately to be put in hand. The Government had been pleased to express its approbation of the manner in which the Tibetan Dictionary and Grammar have been passed through the press, and

had requested that the Asiatic Society would undertake to distribute copies of the work to the principal learned Societies and Universities of Europe and India. In complimenting the Author upon the successful performance of his task, and ordering payment of printing expences, and arrears of salary, the Govei-nor General was further pleased to direct the sum of money remitted to M. CsoMA by Prince ESTEBHAZY and other Hungarian Noblenieu in 1832, which was unfortunately lost by the failure of the house of ALEXANDER and Co. to be restored out of the public purse, an act of liberality which will doubtless be appreci. ated in Vienna.

The Papers submitted to the Society, during the past year, had embraced the discoveries of Bactrian Antiquities by General VENTURA, M. Counr, Dr. MARrm, Mr. Masson, Dr. Gen.-mo, Syed KER.A'ME'l‘ Am, and Mono»: LAL. The notice of various Hindu Inscriptions, and particularly the Translation of one of the Allahabad Inscription, by Captain Taorna and Dr. MILL :——the discovery of a submerged town, replete with antiquities, by Captain CAUTLEY; and many other subjects of considerable interest. In physical research, the progress of discovery had been unprecedently rapid, and the gigantic fossil bones exhu. mated from the lower range of bills, by Dr. FALCONER. and Captain CAUTLEY, had even surpassed the noble specimens presented by Dr. Srxnsnuar. It was now rendered most probable that a belt of fossil deposit existed throughout the whole line of secondary hills skirting the great Himalayan ridge from Cashmir to Ava. It had been penetrated in a few places—at Sewalik, Kooch Behar, and on the Irawadi ; but for many years, it might be anticipated that other spots yet unex. plored would continue to furnish abundant stores for the investigation of the geo. logist and the speculation of the cosmogonist.

Library.

Read a letter from Monsieur Lam, Secretary of the Society of Agri.. culture and Commerce at Caen, forwarding copies of the various publications of that Society for the past two years. '

Read a letter from Monsieur DUTROUILLE, Secretary of the Royal Ace, demy at Bordeaux, forwarding copies of its proceedings, &c. for the years 1832 and 33, and proposing an exchange of publications.

Read a letter from Professor J. J. Msncsn, acknowledging his election as an Honorary member, and presenting his recent publications :

Histoire de l’.Egypte depuis la conquéte des Arabes jusqu’a celle des Francais.

Contes Arabes du Shekh el Mohdy, Nos. 10, 11 , 12, 13.

The following Books were also presented:

Journal of a Tour through the Panjab,Afghanistan, &c. in company with Lieut. Burma; and Dr. German, by Munshi MORAN LA'1., a native of Delhi—-by the author.

Papers relative to the Mahratta War in 1833-4-, by Mr. G. T. Lushington.

Hitopadesi, with a Hindee translation, made by a Pundit of the Raja of Bhartpur—by ditto.

Prithivi Raja Basa, a Hindee Poem, by Chand,-by ditto.

Journal Asiatique, No. 77, August, 1834——by the Asiatic Society ofPa1'2's.

Meteorological Register, Nov. and Dec. 183,41-by the Surveyor General.

A lithographed map of the Indus and the neighbouring countries, from the

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