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the Royal Scottish Society of Arts, and the Society's SILVER MEDAL was awarded to the Author for his “New Principle of Stenography." In the same year this Paper, along with Tables, Plates, &c. embodying the Full and Curt Styles, was published under the title of “Bell's Popular Stenography ;” and in the present Work the System is finally completed by the addition of a Reporting Style. The favour with which the earlier editions have been almost universally received, induces the Author to hope that in its more perfect form the System will be found not unworthy of a permanent place in popular estimation.

Apologies are due to the numerous writers of the Popular Stenography," who have been waiting with just impatience for the appearance of the long promised Reporting Style. Engrossing professional duties, and the desire to render the system complete, and improvements final, by perfecting them in practice, have contributed to a delay which was unexpected, but which has been unavoidable.

13 South Charlotte Street,

Edinburgh.

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2. The Writing of the Alphabet must be practised till each character (except ng) can be distinctly formed in three sizes; full size, as above; half size, and tick size, or very small. (See Plate I.)

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PRINCIPLES OF WRITING. 3. Full sized characters are used when a vowel precedes the conso

ed when no vowel precedes and a vowel follows; and

d of half sized in all combinations.
s the writing is regulated by the sound, and not by

is written j in general, c is k in come and s in d one is wun, n is ng in ink, anger, &c.; i is y in onion,

hus g

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filial, &c.; y final is a vowel ; u has the sound of y consonant, (yoo,) in virtue, cure, &c.; u is w in quick, colloquy, &c. ; w at the end of a syllable is never a consonant, &c. &c.

REPEATER. 5. A short line drawn across the middle of any letter indicates a repetition of the same consonant with preceding vowel. This symbol is necessary only in the case of straight-line characters, when both are thick or both thin; as when p comes before p, 6 before b, s before 8, d before d, &c. ; w and y (small) may be joined to the repeater in such words as quaker, tutor, &c; w being represented by a hook on the right, y by a hook on the left end of the repeater.

VOWELS. 6. The principle of consonant notation renders unnecessary any separate indication for VOWELS, except when they are DOUBLE, as in aerial, or FINAL after full sized consonants, as in airy, in which cases a dot is written opposite the centre of the adjoining consonant. Tuo dots must be written in the case of double final sounds, as in area.

FINAL SYLLABLES ENDING IN VOWELS. 7. Final syllables ending in vowels such as cy, gy, ly, ty, &c., are represented by their consonant written very small, (without a dot,) opposite the centre of the preceding letter, or the last preceding full sized letter. It will generally be unnecessary to indicate vowels before these terminations, in such cases as acy, ally, ity, &c. The following Table contains the principal syllables of this class. b by 1

ly, ally 1s cy, acy, icy w uy (colloquy) d

dym
my, emy sh

ue, (=yoo)
ify in
ny, anyt

ty, ety, ity j gy, ogy P

thy, athy chyr

ry, ary v

...

shy y

...

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py th

k

...

vy

8. VOWEL-WORDS AND ARBITRARY WORD-SYMBOLS. The following Table contains symbols for the eight English words which contain no consonant, and for the same number of words represented arbitrarily.

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Twelve important Prefixes and Terminations are represented by six symbols, as in the following Table.

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Symbols. hook, (joined) dot, (at end) large dot, (at end) two dots, (at end) ring, (joined) semi-circle, crossing concavely) semi-circle, (crossing convexly)

com, con
ex, (expose)
ex, (exist)
inex, unex
circ, circum
enter, inter
exter, tra

ment

(ing)
tious, scious

ness

10. All derivatives and compounds of these prefixes and terminations are denoted by minute alphabetic additions to the symbols. Thus:

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11. DERIVATIVE WORDS. Derivative words formed by the addition of s, ed, &c. to words ending in vowel-sounds (such as pray-s, pray-ed, chew-s, chew-ed, &c.) should be written by adding the s, d, &c. in tick size to the radical word. In this way, prays, pries, &c., will be distinguished from praise, prize,&c.; prayed, pried, &c. from proud, pride, &c.; chews from choose, chewed from chide, &c.

12. The alphabetic characters have no difference of signification dependent on the mode in which they are written, as upwards, dovonwards, &c. Each line has its regular absolute value in all com

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